[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 250 (Thursday, December 30, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 82535-82564]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-32766]



[[Page 82535]]

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Part V





Environmental Protection Agency





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40 CFR Part 52



Limitation of Approval of Prevention of Significant Deterioration 
Provisions Concerning Greenhouse Gas Emitting-Sources in State 
Implementation Plans; Final Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 250 / Thursday, December 30, 2010 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 82536]]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 52

[EPA-HQ-OAR-2009-0517; FRL-9244-9]
RIN 2060-AQ62


Limitation of Approval of Prevention of Significant Deterioration 
Provisions Concerning Greenhouse Gas Emitting-Sources in State 
Implementation Plans; Final Rule

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Final Rule.

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SUMMARY: This action is another in a series of steps EPA is taking to 
implement the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) program for 
greenhouse gas (GHG)-emitting sources. EPA is finalizing its proposed 
rulemaking to narrow its previous approval of State Implementation Plan 
(SIP) PSD programs in 24 states that apply to GHG-emitting sources. 
Specifically, EPA is withdrawing its previous approval of those 
programs to the extent they apply PSD to GHG-emitting sources below the 
thresholds in the final Tailoring Rule, which EPA promulgated by 
Federal Register notice dated June 3, 2010. Having narrowed its prior 
approval, EPA asks that each affected state withdraw from EPA 
consideration the part of its SIP that is no longer approved. The 
states for whose SIPs EPA is narrowing approval are: Alabama, 
California, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North 
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

DATES: This action is effective on December 30, 2010.

ADDRESSES: EPA has established a docket for this rulemaking under 
Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2009-0517. All documents in the docket are 
listed in the http://www.regulations.gov index. Although listed in the 
index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., Confidential 
Business Information or other information whose disclosure is 
restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted 
material, is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available 
only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available 
either electronically in http://www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at 
the EPA Docket Center EPA/DC, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution 
Avenue, Northwest, Washington, DC. The Public Reading Room is open from 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal 
holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 
566-1744, and the telephone number for the EPA Docket Center is (202) 
566-1742.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Michael S. Brooks, Air Quality 
Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (C504-
01), Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; 
telephone number: (919) 541-3539; fax number: (919) 541-5509; e-mail 
address: brooks.michaels@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: For information related to a specific state, 
local, or tribal permitting authority, please contact the appropriate 
EPA regional office:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Contact for regional
                                office (person,
    EPA regional office         mailing address,    Permitting authority
                               telephone number)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
I..........................  Dave Conroy, Chief,    Connecticut,
                              Air Programs Branch,   Massachusetts,
                              EPA Region 1, 5 Post   Maine, New
                              Office Square, Suite   Hampshire, Rhode
                              100, Boston, MA        Island, and
                              02109-3912, (617)      Vermont.
                              918-1661.
II.........................  Raymond Werner,        New Jersey, New
                              Chief, Air Programs    York, Puerto Rico,
                              Branch, EPA Region     and Virgin Islands.
                              2, 290 Broadway,
                              25th Floor, New
                              York, NY 10007-1866,
                              (212) 637-3706.
III........................  Kathleen Anderson,     District of
                              Chief, Permits and     Columbia, Delaware,
                              Technical Assessment   Maryland,
                              Branch, EPA Region     Pennsylvania,
                              3, 1650 Arch Street,   Virginia, and West
                              Philadelphia, PA       Virginia.
                              19103-2029, (215)
                              814-2173.
IV.........................  Lynorae Benjamin       Alabama, Florida,
                              Chief, Regulatory      Georgia, Kentucky,
                              Development Section,   Mississippi, North
                              Air, Pesticides and    Carolina, South
                              Toxics Management      Carolina, and
                              Division, EPA Region   Tennessee.
                              4, Atlanta Federal
                              Center, 61 Forsyth
                              Street, SW, Atlanta,
                              GA 30303-3104, (404)
                              562-9040.
V..........................  J. Elmer Bortzer,      Illinois, Indiana,
                              Chief, Air Programs    Michigan,
                              Branch (AR-18J), EPA   Minnesota, Ohio,
                              Region 5, 77 West      and Wisconsin.
                              Jackson Boulevard,
                              Chicago, IL 60604-
                              3507, (312) 886-1430.
VI.........................  Jeff Robinson, Chief,  Arkansas, Louisiana,
                              Air Permits Section,   New Mexico,
                              EPA Region 6,          Oklahoma, and
                              Fountain Place 12th    Texas.
                              Floor, Suite 1200,
                              1445 Ross Avenue,
                              Dallas, TX 75202-
                              2733, (214) 665-6435.
VII........................  Mark Smith, Chief,     Iowa, Kansas,
                              Air Permitting and     Missouri, and
                              Compliance Branch,     Nebraska.
                              EPA Region 7, 901
                              North 5th Street,
                              Kansas City, KS
                              66101, (913) 551-
                              7876.
VIII.......................  Carl Daly, Unit        Colorado, Montana,
                              Leader, Air            North Dakota, South
                              Permitting,            Dakota, Utah, and
                              Monitoring &           Wyoming.
                              Modeling Unit, EPA
                              Region 8, 1595
                              Wynkoop Street,
                              Denver, CO 80202-
                              1129, (303) 312-6416.
IX.........................  Gerardo Rios, Chief,   Arizona, California,
                              Permits Office, EPA    Hawaii and the
                              Region 9, 75           Pacific Islands,
                              Hawthorne Street,      Indian Country
                              San Francisco, CA      within Region 9 and
                              94105, (415) 972-      Navajo Nation, and
                              3974.                  Nevada.
X..........................  Nancy Helm, Manager,   Alaska, Idaho,
                              Federal and            Oregon, and
                              Delegated Air          Washington.
                              Programs Unit, EPA
                              Region 10, 1200
                              Sixth Avenue, Suite
                              900, Seattle, WA
                              98101, (206) 553-
                              6908.
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[[Page 82537]]

I. General Information

A. Does this action apply to me?

    Entities potentially affected by this rule include states, local 
permitting authorities, and tribal authorities.
    Entities potentially affected by this rule also include sources in 
all industry groups, which have a direct obligation under the Clean Air 
Act (CAA) to obtain a PSD permit for GHGs for projects that meet the 
applicability thresholds set forth in the Tailoring Rule. The majority 
of entities potentially affected by this action are expected to be in 
the following groups:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Industry Group                         NAICS \a\
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture, fishing, and hunting......  11.
Mining.................................  21.
Utilities (electric, natural gas, other  2211, 2212, 2213.
 systems).
Manufacturing (food, beverages,          311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316.
 tobacco, textiles, leather).
Wood product, paper manufacturing......  321, 322.
Petroleum and coal products              32411, 32412, 32419.
 manufacturing.
Chemical manufacturing.................  3251, 3252, 3253, 3254, 3255,
                                          3256, 3259.
Rubber product manufacturing...........  3261, 3262.
Miscellaneous chemical products........  32552, 32592, 32591, 325182,
                                          32551.
Nonmetallic mineral product              3271, 3272, 3273, 3274, 3279.
 manufacturing.
Primary and fabricated metal             3311, 3312, 3313, 3314, 3315,
 manufacturing.                           3321, 3322, 3323, 3324, 3325,
                                          3326, 3327, 3328, 3329.
Machinery manufacturing................  3331, 3332, 3333, 3334, 3335,
                                          3336, 3339.
Computer and electronic products         3341, 3342, 3343, 3344, 3345,
 manufacturing.                           4446.
Electrical equipment, appliance, and     3351, 3352, 3353, 3359.
 component manufacturing.
Transportation equipment manufacturing.  3361, 3362, 3363, 3364, 3365,
                                          3366, 3366, 3369.
Furniture and related product            3371, 3372, 3379.
 manufacturing.
Miscellaneous manufacturing............  3391, 3399.
Waste management and remediation.......  5622, 5629.
Hospitals/Nursing and residential care   6221, 6231, 6232, 6233, 6239.
 facilities.
Personal and laundry services..........  8122, 8123.
Residential/private households.........  8141.
Non-Residential (Commercial)...........  Not available. Codes only exist
                                          for private households,
                                          construction, and leasing/
                                          sales industries.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\a\ North American Industry Classification System.

B. How is this preamble organized?
    The information presented in this preamble is organized as follows:

Outline

I. General Information
    A. Does this action apply to me?
    B. How is this preamble organized?
II. Overview of the Final Rule
III. Proposed Rule
IV. Final Rule
    A. Action
    B. Legal Basis
    C. Legal Mechanisms for EPA Action
V. Comments and Responses
    A. Comments Regarding the Legal Mechanism for the Current Action
    B. Comments on Potential Triggering of Anti-Backsliding 
Provisions
    C. Comments on Persisting Practical Difficulties at the State 
Level
    D. Comments on Preferred Alternative Courses of Action
VI. Effective Date
VII. Statutory and Executive Orders Reviews
    A. Executive Order 12866--Regulatory Planning and Review
    B. Paperwork Reduction Act
    C. Regulatory Flexibility Act
    D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act
    E. Executive Order 13132--Federalism
    F. Executive Order 13175--Consultation and Coordination With 
Indian Tribal Governments
    G. Executive Order 13045--Protection of Children From 
Environmental Health and Safety Risks
    H. Executive Order 13211--Actions That Significantly Affect 
Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use
    I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act
    J. Executive Order 12898--Federal Actions To Address 
Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income 
Populations
    K. Congressional Review Act
    L. Judicial Review
VIII. Statutory Language

II. Overview of the Final Rule

    This action finalizes EPA's proposal to narrow the approval of SIPs 
that we included in what we call the proposed Tailoring Rule, 
``Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V Greenhouse Gas 
Tailoring Rule: Proposed Rule,'' 74 FR 55292, 55340 (October 27, 2009). 
EPA finalized the Tailoring Rule by Federal Register notice dated June 
3, 2010, ``Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V 
Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule: Final Rule, 75 FR 31,514. The Tailoring 
Rule, which followed a series of actions by EPA that will trigger PSD 
applicability to GHG-emitting sources as of January 2, 2011, limits PSD 
applicability for GHG emissions to larger sources.
    The Tailoring Rule accomplished this purpose by setting thresholds 
at which GHG emissions become subject to regulation for PSD and Title V 
purposes.\1\ Under the Tailoring Rule, a source becomes subject to PSD 
requirements based on its GHG emissions only if it both emits GHGs at 
or above the Tailoring Rule thresholds,\2\ which are calculated on a 
carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) basis; and it emits GHGs at 
levels above the statutory 100/250 tons per year (tpy) mass-based 
threshold generally applicable to all PSD-regulated pollutants, and--if 
it is being modified--has or will have an emission increase on a mass 
basis. The Tailoring Rule thresholds were designed to relieve the 
overwhelming administrative burdens and costs associated with the 
dramatic increase in permitting burden that would have resulted from 
applying PSD at the statutory levels on January 2, 2011. Instead, the 
Tailoring rule established a phasing in of applicability for GHG 
sources, starting with the largest GHG emitters.
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    \1\ Only the PSD provisions are relevant for this action.
    \2\ The Tailoring Rule thresholds establish applicability of the 
PSD permitting program to GHG-emitting sources only if they emit GHG 
in amounts above the 75,000/100,000 tpy CO2e.
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    However, in proposing the Tailoring Rule, EPA recognized that even 
after it finalized the Tailoring Rule, most of the SIPs with approved 
PSD programs would--until they were revised--

[[Page 82538]]

continue to apply PSD at the statutory thresholds, even though the 
states would not have sufficient resources to implement the PSD program 
at those levels. Accordingly, the proposed Tailoring Rule included a 
proposal to narrow EPA's previous approval of SIPs such that the SIPs 
would only apply to GHG emissions at or above the higher thresholds 
established in the Tailoring Rule. When EPA finalized the Tailoring 
Rule, EPA did not, however, finalize that part of the proposal. 
Instead, EPA waited to collect more information from the states to 
determine whether such action was necessary, and, if so, for which 
states. EPA is now finalizing that part of the Tailoring Rule proposal 
in 24 states.
    Thus, in this action, EPA is narrowing its previous approval of 
those approved PSD SIP programs that apply PSD to GHG-emitting sources. 
Specifically, EPA is withdrawing their previous approvals of those 
programs to the extent the SIPs apply PSD to increases in GHG emissions 
from GHG-emitting sources with emissions below the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds. The portions of the PSD programs regulating GHGs from GHG-
emitting sources with emissions at or above the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds remain approved.
    The effect of EPA narrowing its approval in this manner is that the 
provisions of previously approved SIPs that apply PSD to GHG emissions 
increases from sources emitting GHGs below the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds will have the status of having been submitted by the state 
but not yet acted upon by EPA. EPA suggests that affected states take 
one of two actions to withdraw these no-longer-approved SIP PSD 
provisions. The state may submit a SIP revision for EPA's approval that 
incorporates the Tailoring Rule thresholds into the SIP. EPA will treat 
the approval of such a submission as removing these no-longer-approved 
provisions. Or, a state may submit a letter to EPA stating that it is 
withdrawing these provisions from EPA's consideration. For any state 
that takes neither of these actions, EPA intends to propose to 
disapprove those provisions. The disapproval, if finalized, will not 
result in the need to resubmit another SIP revision, sanctions, or a 
federal implementation plan (FIP). This is because the provisions of 
the SIP that would be disapproved are not required for any purpose 
under the CAA or necessary to meet any CAA standard.
    This action ensures that the federal law applicable in the affected 
states does not require PSD permitting for GHG emissions below the 
final Tailoring Rule thresholds as of January 2, 2011. Once the states 
take action to amend their state laws, then sources in the affected 
states will not be subject to federal or state requirements to obtain 
permits at the lower 100/250 tpy level. Most, if not all, of the 
affected states have already begun taking steps toward completing these 
changes at the state level, and plan to complete changes to their state 
law and make those changes effective by January 2, 2011. In general, 
these states are now in the process of (or have recently completed) 
incorporating the state law changes into SIP revisions to submit to EPA 
for approval. The combination of this rule and state actions will, in 
the affected states, eliminate, or at least greatly minimize, the time 
during which GHG-emitting sources that are below the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds will be subject to PSD in the state under either state or 
federal law while SIP revisions are being developed, submitted, and 
approved.
    The states for whose SIPs EPA is narrowing approval are: Alabama, 
California,\3\ Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico,\4\ North 
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ Specifically, EPA is narrowing its approval of the SIPs for 
3 districts within California: Mendocino County, North Coast 
Unified, and Northern Sonoma County.
    \4\ EPA is narrowing its approval of both the SIP for New 
Mexico, as well as the SIP for Albuquerque.
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III. Proposed Rule

    We assume familiarity here with the statutory and regulatory 
background discussed in the preambles for the Tailoring Rule proposal 
and final action, and will only briefly summarize that background here.
    Under the CAA PSD program, major stationary sources must obtain a 
permit prior to undertaking construction or modification projects that 
would result in specified amounts of new or increased emissions of air 
pollutants that are subject to regulation under other provisions of the 
CAA. CAA sections 165(a)(1), 169(1). The permit must, among other 
things, include emission limitations associated with the best available 
control technology (BACT). CAA section 165(a)(4).
    In recent months, EPA completed four distinct actions related to 
greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. These actions include, as 
they are commonly called, the ``Endangerment Finding'' and ``Cause or 
Contribute Finding,'' which we issued in a single final action,\5\ the 
``Johnson Memo Reconsideration (also called the ``Timing Decision''),'' 
\6\ the ``Light-Duty Vehicle Rule (LDVR),'' \7\ and the ``Tailoring 
Rule.'' \8\ In the Endangerment Finding, which is governed by CAA Sec.  
202(a), the Administrator exercised her judgment, based on an 
exhaustive review and analysis of the science, to conclude that ``six 
greenhouse gases taken in combination endanger both the public health 
and the public welfare of current and future generations.'' 74 FR at 
66,496. The Administrator also found ``that the combined emissions of 
these greenhouse gases from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle 
engines contribute to the greenhouse gas air pollution that endangers 
public health and welfare under CAA section 202(a).'' Id. The 
Endangerment Finding led directly to promulgation of the Vehicle Rule, 
also governed by CAA Sec.  202(a), in which EPA set standards for the 
emission of greenhouse gases for new motor vehicles built for model 
years 2012-2016. 75 FR 25,324. The other two actions, the Johnson Memo 
Reconsideration and the Tailoring Rule, governed by the PSD and Title V 
provisions in the CAA, were issued to address the automatic statutory 
triggering of these programs for greenhouse gases due to the Vehicle 
Rule establishing the first controls for greenhouse gases under the 
Act. More specifically, the Johnson Memo Reconsideration provided EPA's 
interpretation of a pre-existing definition in its PSD regulations 
delineating the ``pollutants'' that are taken into account in 
determining whether a source must obtain a PSD permit and the 
pollutants each permit must control. Regarding the Vehicle Rule, the 
Johnson Memo Reconsideration stated that such regulations, when they 
take effect on January 2, 2011, will, by operation of the applicable 
CAA requirements, subject GHG-emitting sources to PSD

[[Page 82539]]

requirements. 75 FR 17,004. The Tailoring Rule established a series of 
steps by which PSD and Title V permit requirements for greenhouse gases 
are phased in, starting with the largest sources of greenhouse gas 
emissions. 75 FR 31,514. In addition, by Federal Register notice dated 
September 2, 2010, EPA proposed to find that the SIPs for 13 states 
with approved PSD programs are substantially inadequate to meet CAA 
requirements because they fail to apply their PSD program to GHG-
emitting sources, and EPA proposed to issue a ``SIP call'' under CAA 
section 110(k)(5) for those states that would require submission of a 
corrective SIP revision. 75 FR 53,892. At the same time, EPA proposed a 
FIP, under CAA Sec.  110(c), for those states. 75 FR 53,883.
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    \5\ ``Endangerment and Cause or Contribute Findings for 
Greenhouse Gases Under Section 202(a) of the Clean Air Act.'' 74 FR 
66,496 (December 15, 2009).
    \6\ ``Interpretation of Regulations that Determine Pollutants 
Covered by Clean Air Act Permitting Programs.'' 75 FR 17,004 (April 
2, 2010). This action finalizes EPA's response to a petition for 
reconsideration of ``EPA's Interpretation of Regulations that 
Determine Pollutants Covered by Federal Prevention of Significant 
Deterioration (PSD) Permit Program'' (commonly referred to as the 
``Johnson Memo''), December 18, 2008.
    \7\ ``Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and 
Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards; Final Rule.'' 75 FR 25,324 
(May 7, 2010).
    \8\ ``Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V 
Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule; Final Rule.'' 75 FR 31,514 (June 3, 
2010).
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    In the proposed Tailoring Rule, EPA proposed a major stationary 
source threshold of 25,000 tpy for GHG on a CO2e basis, for 
at least a specified period. EPA recognized that even so, many SIPs 
with approved PSD programs would require PSD permitting of GHG-emitting 
sources at the 100/250 tpy statutory major source threshold generally 
applicable to regulated New Source Review (NSR) pollutants, as well as 
at the ``any increase'' level for modifications, and that these SIPs 
would remain in place even after we finalized the Tailoring Rule. Thus, 
in those states, until states revised those SIPs, sources would remain 
subject to these thresholds as a matter of both state and federal law 
even after we finalized the Tailoring Rule. This would result in the 
same problems of overwhelming administrative burdens and costs that we 
designed the Tailoring Rule to address.
    EPA also recognized that the solution to these problems lay in the 
form of SIP revisions that EPA would approve to raise the thresholds in 
approved state PSD permitting programs to conform to the Tailoring Rule 
(or, in the alternative, in the form of increased state resources).
    Until the states could develop and submit for approval such SIP 
revisions, and EPA could approve them, EPA proposed to narrow its 
approval of the existing EPA-approved SIPs that would regulate GHG 
emissions at levels below the Tailoring Rule thresholds. Specifically, 
EPA proposed to narrow its approval of the permitting threshold 
provisions, including the significance threshold provisions in the 
SIPs, to the extent those provisions required PSD permits for sources 
whose GHG emissions fall below the proposed Tailoring Rule thresholds. 
EPA based its proposed narrowing of approval on the fact that while the 
SIPs would require PSD to apply at the 100/250 tpy levels (and at the 
any mass increase level for modifications), the states do not have the 
resources to implement the program at that level, and thus the SIPs 
were inconsistent with CAA section 110(a)(2)(E)(i), which requires that 
states provide necessary assurances that they have adequate funding and 
personnel to implement their SIPs. EPA proposed to rely, as the legal 
mechanisms for the proposed narrowing of approval, on CAA section 
301(a), which provides the EPA Administrator with general regulatory 
authority to issue regulations necessary to carry out her CAA 
functions; and on the authority of an agency to reconsider its actions 
inherent in the Administrative Procedures Act (APA) section 553. In the 
alternative, EPA proposed to rely on the error correction provision of 
CAA section 110(k)(6). EPA did not propose to issue a SIP call under 
CAA section 110(k)(5) for these SIP provisions.
    In the final Tailoring Rule, EPA established a schedule to phase-in 
threshold levels of GHG emissions below which a source will not be 
required to obtain a PSD permit.\9\ EPA established the initial levels 
(which are higher than those in the proposed Tailoring Rule) in the 
first two steps of the phase-in schedule, committed the agency to take 
future steps addressing smaller sources, and excluded the smallest 
sources from PSD permitting for GHG emissions until at least April 30, 
2016.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \9\ The final Tailoring Rule also established a threshold of 
100,000 tpy CO2e for when a source would be considered a 
``major source'' subject to title V permitting under 40 CFR part 70 
and part 71. This rule addresses issues related to adoption of the 
Tailoring Rule thresholds for state PSD programs only. EPA will 
promulgate a separate rule to address issues related to the adoption 
of the Tailoring Rule threshold for approved state operating permit 
programs. EPA notes, however, that some state title V programs are 
incorporated into SIPs and that further corrections of the SIP may 
be necessary in such cases.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, in the final Tailoring Rule, EPA chose revision of the 
definition of the term ``subject to regulation'' as the mechanism to 
revise the PSD thresholds for GHG. Under the PSD program, a major 
stationary source is subject to PSD. A major stationary source is 
defined as a source that emits 100/250 tpy on a mass basis of a 
regulated NSR pollutant, and a regulated NSR pollutant, in turn, is 
defined as, among other things, a pollutant that is subject to 
regulation under the CAA. In the final Tailoring Rule, EPA defined the 
term ``subject to regulation'' so that GHG emissions from sources at or 
above specified thresholds (depending on the circumstances, 75,000 and/
or 100,000 tpy on a CO2e basis) are treated as subject to 
regulation. Thus, sources that emit that amount are subject to PSD as 
long as that amount of GHG also exceeds 100/250 tpy on a mass basis and 
with respect to modifications there is a defined emissions 
increase.\10\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \10\ Unlike the proposed Tailoring Rule, the final Tailoring 
Rule did not set significance levels for GHG emissions.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some states advised EPA that it is likely they would be able to 
implement the Tailoring Rule thresholds by interpreting the term 
``subject to regulation'' in their SIPs. A state's implementation of 
the Tailoring Rule in this manner, or in any other manner, prior to 
January 2, 2011, obviates the need for EPA to narrow its approval of 
the state's SIP. Thus, in the final Tailoring Rule, EPA delayed final 
action on its proposal to narrow approval for any SIP-approved PSD 
programs. EPA deferred making any decision regarding whether to narrow 
its approval of any SIPs until after learning the process and time-line 
for states to implement the Tailoring Rule. Based on information it had 
received, EPA expected that many states would quickly adopt the 
interpretation of the term ``subject to regulation'' used in the final 
Tailoring Rule, and thereby obviate the need for EPA to narrow its 
approval or take any other action with respect to the SIP. Thus, EPA 
asked states to submit information--in the form of letters due within 
60 days of publication of the Tailoring Rule (which we refer to as the 
60-day letters)--that would help EPA determine whether it needed to 
narrow its approval of any SIPs.
    Almost all states submitted 60-day letters. The letters, in 
conjunction with other information EPA received, indicate that the 
states, localities, and other jurisdictions may be divided into three 
categories. The first, which includes 7 states, 35 subsections of 
states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, 
the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Indian Territory, does not have an 
approved SIP PSD permitting program. Instead, federal requirements 
apply. Thus, in these jurisdictions, the thresholds in the Tailoring 
Rule will apply without further action.
    The second category includes the states (or districts within 
states) whose SIPs do not appear to apply the PSD program to GHG-
emitting sources. As a result, EPA proposed a SIP call and FIP for 
these states by notice dated September 2, 2010. 75 FR 53892. Based on 
the 60-day letters, letters EPA received in response to the proposed 
SIP call and FIP (which we refer to as

[[Page 82540]]

the 30-day letters), and additional information EPA has received, EPA 
finalized (at about the same time as this action) a SIP call in 13 
states, including 4 districts within states.
    The remaining 30 states and 6 districts within states, the third 
category, have approved SIPs that apply their PSD program to GHG-
emitting sources. In those states, absent further action, sources 
emitting GHGs at or above the 100/250 tpy levels will be subject to PSD 
requirements as of January 2, 2011, if they construct or modify. Of 
these localities, 6 states and 4 districts within states have indicated 
that they would interpret their SIPs to regulate GHG emissions only 
above the Tailoring Rule thresholds, and no further action was needed 
to do so. EPA approved a SIP for 1 state--New York--for the first time 
in November 2010, and that original approval itself was limited to 
exclude the part of the PSD program that applies to GHG emissions below 
the Tailoring Rule thresholds. All or part of twenty-four states, 
including 4 districts, indicated that they would need to submit SIP 
revisions to EPA in order to incorporate the Tailoring Rule thresholds. 
Some of these states indicated, however, that they would not be able to 
complete these changes prior to January 2, 2011. Some states have 
completed their SIP revisions and submitted them to EPA, and EPA 
expects to take final action on them promptly. EPA has only signed SIP 
revision approvals for two states, Alabama and Mississippi, though 
neither of these approvals has yet been published as of the signing of 
this rule. These states--including those that have indicated that they 
would submit SIP revisions to EPA to incorporate the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds, but for which EPA has not approved such SIP revision as of 
the date of this rule--are included in this rule.
    It should be noted that this rule focuses on eliminating the PSD 
obligations under federal law for sources below the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds in states in the third category, those with approved SIPs 
that do not incorporate the Tailoring Rule. The sources in those states 
also have permitting obligations under state law. EPA has strongly 
encouraged states to eliminate the state law obligations by revising 
their state law as promptly as possible. Such a revision to state law 
can eliminate those sources' state obligations, even before the state 
is able to process the revision as a SIP revision and submit it to EPA 
for approval. In almost all cases, states are proceeding to revise 
their state law to reflect the Tailoring Rule thresholds and will have 
done so by January 2, 2011, or very soon thereafter.
    In their 60-day letters, none of the states indicated either that 
they intended to regulate GHG-emitting sources at a level below the 
Tailoring Rule thresholds, or that they could or would increase their 
permitting resources to do so.

IV. Final Rule

A. Action

    EPA is taking final action to narrow its approval of the SIPs for 
certain states. In the final Tailoring Rule, EPA established levels of 
GHG emissions below which PSD provisions do not apply. However, some 
SIPs currently apply the PSD program to a source that emits GHGs below 
the Tailoring Rule thresholds, at levels at which, under the Tailoring 
Rule, GHGs are not a pollutant ``subject to regulation'' under the CAA, 
so that the emitting source is not a major stationary source subject to 
PSD on account of its GHG emissions. Thus, EPA is now narrowing its 
approval of some approved SIPs so that the PSD programs under those 
SIPs are approved to apply to GHG-emitting sources only if those 
sources emit GHGs at or above Tailoring Rule thresholds. EPA is 
accomplishing this narrowing by withdrawing its previous approval of 
those PSD programs to the extent they apply to GHG-emitting sources 
that emit below the Tailoring Rule thresholds.
    Those provisions of SIPs from which EPA is withdrawing its approval 
will be treated as submitted by the state for approval and not yet 
acted upon by EPA. If a state submits a SIP revision for EPA's approval 
that incorporates the Tailoring Rule thresholds into the SIP, EPA will 
treat the approval of the submission as removing these no-longer-
approved provisions. We note that once SIP revisions incorporating the 
Tailoring Rule thresholds are approved after the issuance of this rule, 
they will supersede the changes made in this rule. That is, this rule 
amends the regulatory language in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 
approving each of the relevant SIPs. When EPA approves a SIP revision, 
EPA will remove from the CFR the regulatory language added by this 
rule.
    Alternatively, EPA suggests that the affected states may withdraw 
those provisions from EPA's consideration through a letter to the EPA 
Regional Administrator. EPA offers the following as model language that 
the state should feel free to use, but is not required to use:

    In its final rule entitled ``Limitation of Approval of 
Prevention of Significant Deterioration Provisions Concerning 
Greenhouse Gas Emitting-Sources in State Implementation Plans'' and 
published on [DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER], EPA 
amended the Code of Federal Regulations at [LOCATION OF CFR 
AMENDMENT RELEVANT TO STATE/DISTRICT] and withdrew EPA's approval of 
that portion of [STATE]'s SIP that would require sources to seek PSD 
permitting for emissions of GHGs in amounts below the thresholds 
specified in the Tailoring Rule, 74 FR 55292 (October 27, 2009). 
[STATE] now acts to withdraw from EPA's consideration that portion 
of [STATE]'s SIP from which EPA withdrew its approval in that 
action. These provisions are no longer intended for inclusion in the 
SIP, and are no longer before EPA for its approval or disapproval.

    If a state does not withdraw the SIP provisions for which EPA is 
rescinding approval, and does not submit a SIP revision incorporating 
the Tailoring Rule thresholds that would supercede this rule, EPA 
intends to propose to disapprove the relevant provisions in the near 
future. Any disapproval of such SIP provisions--again, those applying 
PSD to GHG-emitting sources that emit GHGs below the Tailoring Rule 
threshold--will not, if finalized, result in the need to resubmit 
another SIP revision, in sanctions, or in a FIP. This is because the 
relevant provisions are not necessary to meet any applicable CAA 
requirement. See CAA sections 110(k)(3) (requirements for SIP 
disapproval), 179(a)(2) (sanctions).
    In the proposed Tailoring Rule, EPA proposed to narrow its approval 
for all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto 
Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. EPA now finalizes 
this narrowing of approval for only the SIPs with PSD programs that 
will apply to GHG emissions as of January 2, 2011, and for which the 
states have not either said that they interpret their SIPs to 
incorporate the Tailoring Rule thresholds for GHG emissions without the 
need for further action, or completed taking any further action 
necessary to incorporate the Tailoring Rule thresholds. This rule does 
not include final action on the proposal to narrow EPA's approval of 
SIPs for states that do not have approved PSD SIP programs (the first 
category previously described), and states that have approved PSD SIP 
programs that do not apply to GHGs (the second category previously 
described). This rule also does not take final action on the proposal 
to narrow EPA's approval of SIPs for states that have PSD SIP programs 
that cover GHG emissions, and that have already incorporated the 
Tailoring Rule thresholds via interpretation, SIP revision, or any 
other mechanism. The language being used

[[Page 82541]]

for this final narrowing rule reflects changes from the language 
proposed in the Tailoring Rule in order to clarify and reflect the 
decisions about permitting thresholds reached in the final Tailoring 
Rule.
    The states for whom EPA is narrowing its approval of the SIP PSD 
program in this action include: Alabama, California, Colorado, Georgia, 
Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New 
Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and 
Wisconsin.

B. Legal Basis

    EPA is narrowing its previous approval for each of the affected 
SIPs because EPA erred when it approved each SIP's PSD program. In 
those approvals, EPA failed to account for an important flaw in the 
SIP. As a result, EPA is rescinding its previous approval for the part 
of the SIP that is flawed, and EPA is leaving in place its previous 
approval for the rest of the SIP. The flaw is that the applicability 
provisions of the PSD program (which determined the pollutants to which 
PSD permitting applies) were phrased so broadly that they could, under 
certain circumstances, sweep in more sources than the program could 
accommodate in light of the resources that, under the SIP--in 
accordance with what we refer to as the ``state assurances'' provision 
under CAA Sec.  110(a)(2)(E)(i)--were available or for which a plan was 
in place to acquire. The part of PSD applicability that is broader than 
what the state assurances covered is the part that exceeds EPA 
requirements for PSD applicability. The following section discusses 
this basis in more detail, beginning with the PSD applicability 
provisions; then the state assurances provisions; and then how the two 
provisions, read together, gave rise to the flaws in the SIPs.
1. PSD Applicability
    Each of the states subject to this rule has an approved PSD SIP 
program that applies to sources of pollutants subject to regulation 
under the CAA. Some states' programs meet EPA's PSD requirements as 
they read prior to promulgation of the 2002 NSR rulemaking, which we 
refer to as the NSR Reform rule.\11\ These pre-Reform SIPs, include a 
PSD applicability provision that provides that PSD applies to ``any air 
pollutant subject to regulation.'' 40 CFR 51.166(b)(1)(i) (2001). Other 
states subject to this rule have an approved PSD program that includes 
the NSR Reform rule. The Reform requirements, replaced the term ``any 
air pollutant subject to regulation'' with the term ``regulated NSR 
pollutant,'' 40 CFR 51.166(b)(1)(i), and defined that latter term to 
include pollutants regulated under specified provisions of the CAA as 
well as ``any pollutant that is otherwise subject to regulation under 
[the CAA].'' 40 CFR 51.166(b)(49)(iv). This quoted provision is similar 
to the pre-Reform provision, as both include the phrase ``subject to 
regulation'' in reference to the types of air pollutants that will be 
subject to the PSD program. Thus, each of the states subject to this 
rule has an approved PSD program--whether pre-Reform or Reform--that 
applies to any air pollutant that is ``subject to regulation'' under 
the CAA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \11\ ``Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and 
Nonattainment New Source Review (NNSR): Baseline Emissions 
Determination, Actual-to-Future-Actuals Methodology, Plantwide 
Applicability Limitations, Clean Units, Pollution Control 
Projects,'' Final Rule, 67 FR 10816 (December 2, 2002).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    These applicability provisions mean that under federal law, in each 
of these SIPs, PSD will expand to cover additional sources that emit a 
pollutant different than the ones already covered under the PSD program 
as soon as EPA promulgates a rule regulating that pollutant under any 
other provision of the CAA. Depending on the pollutant and the number 
and size of sources that emit it, these applicability provisions could 
result in a significant and rapid expansion of the PSD program. This is 
precisely what is happening at present, now that EPA has promulgated 
the LDVR, to take effect on January 2, 2011, at which time GHGs will 
become subject to regulation under CAA section 202(a).
    Importantly, the states affected by this action, while including in 
their SIPs a PSD applicability provision that applies PSD to any 
pollutant ``subject to regulation,'' generally do not interpret their 
applicability provision, or any other provision in their SIPs, to 
incorporate limits on PSD applicability with respect to a new pollutant 
and the SIPs do not contain any other mechanism that would allow the 
State to interpret applicability more narrowly. As a result, the 
affected states' applicability provisions include no way to limit the 
speed or extent of the expansion a PSD program might be required to 
undergo to regulate new pollutants.
    The case of GHGs has highlighted the potential scale of a PSD 
program for a new pollutant under such open-ended provisions. As 
described in the final Tailoring Rule, EPA promulgated the LDVR, which 
is the rule that, upon January 2, 2011, when it takes effect, subjects 
GHGs to regulation. The LDVR identifies GHGs as the group of six air 
pollutants made up of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur 
hexafluoride, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. 75 FR 31514, 
31519 (June 3, 2010) (Tailoring Rule discussion); 75 FR 25324 (May 7, 
2010) (LDVR). Accordingly, the SIPs affected by this action will, as of 
January 2, 2011, treat GHGs as a pollutant ``subject to regulation'' 
and therefore apply PSD to GHG-emitting sources. As previously 
discussed, these SIPs will apply PSD to new GHG-emitting sources at the 
100/250 tpy levels and to modified GHG-emitting sources at the any-
mass-increase levels. None of these SIPs, as currently approved, 
permits the interpretation of the PSD applicability more narrowly, to 
apply to only GHG-emitting sources at or above the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds. In contrast, as previously noted, several other states are 
able to interpret their SIPs more narrowly and, as a result, are not 
subject to this action.
    The scale of the administrative program needed to effectively 
permit all sources emitting GHGs at the 100/250 tpy levels has 
highlighted the unconstrained nature of the SIPs' applicability 
provisions. EPA has recognized that a PSD program regulating GHGs at 
the 100/250 tpy levels is administratively unmanageable and creates 
absurd results that were not intended by Congress when it passed the 
CAA. Thus, in the Tailoring Rule, EPA phased in GHG PSD applicability, 
so that at the outset PSD applies to GHG-emitting sources only if they 
also emit GHG in amounts above the 75,000/100,000 tpy CO2e 
thresholds set out in that rule.\12\ EPA included this limit in its 
regulations, and through this limit greatly reduced the extent of PSD 
applicability. This limit was set at a level at which EPA determined 
states would have the resources to implement a PSD program for GHG 
emissions. By contrast, each of these SIPs applies GHG PSD 
applicability more broadly--indeed, much more broadly, to far more

[[Page 82542]]

sources and to much smaller sources--than EPA's regulations do.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \12\ In its first phase, starting January 2, 2011, PSD 
requirements for GHGs apply to sources that are required to seek a 
PSD permit for non-GHG pollutants, and that also increase emissions 
of GHG by at least 75,000 tpy CO2e. In its second phase, 
starting July 1, 2011, PSD requirements for GHGs will also apply to 
new sources that emit or with potential to emit at least 100,000 tpy 
CO2e, and existing sources that emit or have the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e and that undertake a 
modification that increases net emissions of GHGs by at least 75,000 
tpy CO2e.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    We note that there is nothing inherently problematic about a SIP 
imposing PSD applicability, or applying other control requirements, as 
broadly as a state might choose. SIPs may lawfully do so and EPA may 
lawfully approve them in accordance with the provisions of section 
110(a) of the CAA. Similarly, there is nothing inherently problematic 
with a SIP failing to include any measures to limit the scope of its 
control requirements. Even so, the SIP must provide for adequate 
resources, and must do so on the appropriate schedule, as discussed 
next.
2. State Assurances of Adequate Resources
    Each of the states subject to this rule was also required to 
include in its SIP adequate state ``assurances,'' in accordance with 
CAA section 110(a)(2)(E)(i). This provision requires the SIP to 
``provide * * * necessary assurances that the State * * * will have 
adequate personnel, funding, and authority under State * * * law to 
carry out such implementation plan* * *.'' EPA has implemented this 
requirement in 40 CFR 51.280, which provides,

    Each plan must include a description of the resources available 
to the State and local agencies at the date of submission of the 
plan and any additional resources needed to carry out the plan 
during the 5-year period following its submission. The description 
must include projections of the extent to which resources will be 
acquired at 1-, 3-, and 5-year intervals.

These CAA and regulatory requirements concerning assurances apply to 
the SIP as a whole, including the PSD program. Therefore, at the time 
that the state submitted the PSD provisions of the SIP for EPA 
approval, the SIP was required to include assurances that adequate 
resources would be available to implement the SIP in its entirety, 
including the PSD program.
    As previously noted, the affected SIPs included expansive PSD 
applicability provisions for newly regulated pollutants, without a 
means to limit that applicability. Under these circumstances, state 
assurances are needed to assure adequate resources in the event of an 
expansion of the PSD program to new pollutants, even when this would 
require a rapid and sizeable expansion of the resources dedicated to 
the state PSD program, whether due to the large number of sources 
emitting the new pollutant or any other reason. EPA has the authority 
to define, under CAA section 110(a)(2)(E)(i), what assurances are 
``necessary'' so that the state will have ``adequate'' resources. To be 
sure, EPA does not read the assurances requirement to require that the 
state should somehow hold in reserve large amounts of resources to 
cover the possibility that the PSD program would undergo such a large 
and rapid expansion. However, EPA does read the requirement to require 
that the state have a plan for acquiring the requisite additional 
amount of resources in the case of an expansion in PSD applicability. 
Moreover, that plan should include an implementation schedule that 
would be consistent with the timing of expansion in PSD applicability. 
PSD expansion may occur quite rapidly because PSD requirements apply 
immediately once they are triggered by subjecting a pollutant to 
regulation. This is because of the CAA requirement that stationary 
sources may not construct or modify unless they first have acquired a 
permit. CAA section 165(a). That is, as soon as a pollutant is subject 
to regulation--as will occur for GHGs on January 2, 2011--the 
pollutant-emitting sources to which PSD then applies cannot lawfully 
undertake construction or modification projects without first procuring 
a PSD permit.
    It is clear, however, that none of the SIPs affected by this action 
include such a plan among their assurances. In the proposed Tailoring 
Rule, EPA stated that at the time that the LDVR triggers PSD 
applicability, if it triggers such applicability at the 100/250 tpy 
level, then far greater numbers of sources will require permitting than 
currently do. As a result, EPA added, the administrative burdens 
associated with permitting small sources for affected state and local 
permitting authorities would overwhelm the authorities. For each state, 
EPA proposed to rescind approval of the part of the SIP that applies 
PSD to sources below the Tailoring Rule thresholds, unless the state 
demonstrated that it had adequate resources to permit at the lower 
levels. During the comment period on this proposal, no authority 
contested this understanding of the facts, none stated that they could 
administer PSD at the 100/250 tpy levels, and none contested the 
proposal on grounds that they have adequate resources. In the final 
Tailoring Rule, EPA refined, on the basis of comments, the precise 
extent of the administrative burden, but confirmed that the burden was 
overwhelming and that states lacked adequate resources. In the final 
Tailoring Rule, EPA requested that states submit letters within 60 days 
of publication of the rule describing how they intended to implement 
PSD for GHG-emitting sources.\13\ In those letters, none of the states 
claimed they could, or intended to, implement the Tailoring Rule at the 
statutory levels. From all this, it is clear that none of the states 
had included in their state assurances an adequate plan to acquire 
resources to administer the PSD program for their GHG-emitting sources 
at the 100/250 tpy level.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \13\ The 60-day letters are available at http://www.epa.gov/NSR/2010letters.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It must be emphasized that there is nothing inherently problematic 
with a SIP whose state assurances do not include the previously-
described plan to acquire additional resources. Only SIPs that lack any 
constraints to limit PSD applicability for new pollutants to match 
their resources must include such a plan.
3. Flaw in SIP
    Based on the previous analysis, it is clear that the SIPs subject 
to this action are flawed. They each are structured in a manner that 
may impose PSD applicability on new pollutants in an unconstrained 
manner, and yet they do not have a plan for acquiring resources to 
adequately administer any large new components of the PSD program, and 
to do so on the same schedule that sources may become subject to PSD. 
As previously explained, the SIPs' unconstrained applicability is not 
by itself a flaw. The flaw is the combination of that unconstrained 
applicability and the failure of the SIP to plan for adequate resources 
for that applicability, and do so on the appropriate time-table. In 
short, the SIPs' PSD applicability provisions and their state 
assurances are mismatched and therefore the SIP is flawed. As 
previously discussed, EPA's recently promulgated GHG rules have 
highlighted this flaw.
    EPA notes that since the enactment of the PSD provisions, EPA has 
periodically subjected pollutants to control for the first time, 
thereby triggering PSD applicability. At the time the affected SIPs 
were submitted and approved, this structural flaw could have been 
recognized. That is, it could have been recognized that (i) the PSD 
applicability provisions were essentially unconstrained, but that the 
resources the state assured would be available were constrained; and 
(ii) at some point in time, a pollutant could become newly regulated 
that would expand PSD applicability to a point that would require 
resources beyond what the state assured would be available. It bears 
reiterating that EPA has discretion to interpret the CAA's SIP 
requirements,

[[Page 82543]]

including what state assurances are required. In EPA's view, the 
breadth of the affected SIPs' provisions concerning PSD applicability, 
combined with the limited state assurances, constitutes a flaw.

C. Legal Mechanisms for EPA Action

    Because the SIPs were flawed, EPA approval of them was in error. 
Two mechanisms are available for addressing that error: The error 
correction mechanism provided under CAA section 110(k)(6), 42 U.S.C. 
section 7410(k)(6), or EPA's inherent general authority to reconsider 
its own actions under CAA section 301(a), 42 U.S.C. section 7601(a), 
read in conjunction with CAA section 110(k) and other statutory 
provisions, and case law holding that an agency has inherent authority 
to reconsider its prior actions.
1. Error Correction Under CAA Section 110(k)(6)
    CAA section 110(k)(6) provides as follows:

    Whenever the Administrator determines that the Administrator's 
action approving, disapproving, or promulgating any plan or plan 
revision (or part thereof), area designation, redesignation, 
classification, or reclassification was in error, the Administrator 
may in the same manner as the approval, disapproval, or promulgation 
revise such action as appropriate without requiring any further 
submission from the State. Such determination and the basis thereof 
shall be provided to the State and public.

The key provisions are that the Administrator has the authority to 
``determine [ ]'' when a SIP approval was ``in error,'' and when she 
does so, she may then revise the SIP approval ``as appropriate,'' in 
the same manner as the approval, and without requiring any further 
submission from the state. With this action, EPA is determining that 
its action approving the PSD SIP provisions was ``in error'' due to the 
mismatch, previously discussed, between the PSD applicability 
provisions and the state assurances. EPA is further determining that 
the appropriate action EPA can take--in light of EPA's proposal as part 
of the proposed Tailoring Rule--to revise that prior action is to 
rescind approval of the PSD program to the extent it applies PSD to 
GHG-emitting sources below the Tailoring Rule threshold. Thus, EPA is 
narrowing its approval of the PSD programs as indicated. EPA may 
consider further action in the future.
a. Type of Error
    These determinations are authorized under the CAA. First, approval 
of the SIPs in light of the mismatch constitutes an ``error'' within 
the meaning of CAA section 110(k)(6). As previously quoted, CAA section 
110(k)(6) provides EPA with the authority to correct its own ``error,'' 
but nowhere does this provision or any other provision in the CAA 
define what qualifies as ``error.'' Thus, the term should be given its 
plain language, everyday meaning. Webster's II Dictionary defines an 
``error'' as: ``(1) an act, assertion, or belief that unintentionally 
deviates from what is correct, right or true, (2) the state of having 
false knowledge . . . (4) a mistake . . .'' Webster's II New Riverside 
University Dictionary 442 (Houghton Mifflin Co. 1988). Similarly, the 
Oxford American College Dictionary 467--(2d ed. 2007) defines ``error'' 
as ``a mistake'' or ``the state or condition of being wrong in conduct 
or judgment.'' These definitions are broad, and include all 
unintentional, incorrect or wrong actions or mistakes.
    The legislative history of CAA section 110(k)(6) is silent 
regarding the definition of error, but the timing of the enactment of 
the provision suggests a broad interpretation. The provision was 
enacted shortly after the Third Circuit decision in Concerned Citizens 
of Bridesburg v. U.S. EPA, 836 F.2d 777 (1987). In Bridesburg, the 
court adopted a narrow interpretation of EPA's authority to 
unilaterally correct errors. The court stated that such authority was 
limited to typographical and other similar errors, and stated that any 
other change to a SIP must be accomplished through a SIP revision. Id. 
at 786. In Bridesburg, EPA determined that it lacked authority to 
include odor regulations as part of a SIP unless the odor regulations 
had a significant relationship to achieving a NAAQS, and so directly 
acted to remove 13-year-old odor provisions from the Pennsylvania SIP. 
Id. at 779-80. EPA found the previous approval of the provisions to 
have been an inadvertent error, and so used its ``inherent authority to 
correct an inadvertent mistake'' to withdraw its prior approval of the 
odor regulations without seeking approval of the change from 
Pennsylvania. Id. at 779-80, 785. After noting that Congress had not 
contemplated the need for revision on the grounds cited by EPA, Id. at 
780, the court found that EPA's ``inherent authority to correct an 
inadvertent mistake'' was limited to corrections such as 
``typographical errors,'' and that instead EPA was required to use the 
SIP revision process to remove the odor provision from the SIP. Id. at 
785-86.
    When the court made its determination in Bridesburg in 1987, there 
was no provision explicitly addressing EPA's error correction authority 
under the CAA. In 1990, Congress passed CAA section 110(k)(6), 
apparently for the purpose of overturning the Bridesburg opinion. This 
is apparent because CAA section 110(k)(6) both (i) authorizes EPA to 
correct SIP approvals and other actions that were ``in error,'' which, 
as previously noted, broadly covers any mistake, and thereby contrasts 
with the holding in Bridesburg that EPA's pre-section 110(k)(6) 
authority was limited to correction of typographical or similar 
mistakes; and (ii) provides that the error correction need not be 
accomplished via the SIP revision or SIP call process, which contrasts 
with the holding of Bridesburg requiring a SIP revision. Because 
Congress apparently intended CAA section 110(k)(6) to overturn 
Bridesburg, the definition of ``error'' in that provision should be 
sufficiently broad to encompass the error that EPA asserted it made in 
its approval action at issue in Bridesburg, which goes well beyond 
typographical or other similar mistakes.
    EPA has used CAA section 110(k)(6) in the past to correct errors of 
a non-technical nature. For example, EPA has used CAA section 110(k)(6) 
as authority to make substantive corrections to remove a variety of 
provisions from federally approved SIPs that are not related to the 
attainment or maintenance of NAAQS or any other CAA requirement. See, 
e.g., ``Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Kentucky: 
Approval of Revisions to the State Implementation Plan,'' 75 FR 2440 
(Jan. 15, 2010) (correcting the SIP by removing a provision, approved 
in 1982, used to address hazardous or toxic air pollutants); ``Approval 
and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York,'' 73 FR 21,546 
(April 22, 2008) (issuing a direct final rule to correct a prior SIP 
correction from 1998 that removed general duties from the SIP but 
neglected to remove a reference to ``odor'' in the definition of ``air 
contaminant or air pollutant''); ``Approval and Promulgation of 
Implementation Plans; New York,'' 63 FR 65557 (Nov. 27, 1998) (issuing 
direct final rule to correct SIP by removing a general duty ``nuisance 
provision'' that had been approved in 1984); ``Correction of 
Implementation Plans; American Samoa, Arizona, California, Hawaii, and 
Nevada State Implementation Plans,'' 63 FR 34,641 (June 27, 1997) 
(correcting five SIPs by deleting a variety of administrative 
provisions concerning variances, hearing board procedures, and fees 
that had been approved during the 1970s).

[[Page 82544]]

    EPA's approval of the PSD SIP provisions, in light of the mismatch 
between those provisions and the state assurances, was ``in error'' 
within the meaning of CAA section 110(k)(6). Under the familiar Chevron 
two-step framework for interpreting administrative statutes, an agency 
must, under Chevron step 1, determine whether ``Congress has directly 
spoken to the precise question at issue.'' If so, ``the court, as well 
as the agency, must give effect to the unambiguously expressed intent 
of Congress.'' However, under Chevron step 2, if ``the statute is 
silent or ambiguous with respect to the specific issue, the question 
for the court is whether the agency's answer is based on a permissible 
construction of the statute.'' Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. NRDC, 467 U.S. 
837, 842-43 (1984).
    As previously discussed, the PSD SIPs were flawed due to the 
mismatch between the PSD applicability provisions and the state 
assurances. EPA's action approving the PSD SIPs in the face of that 
flaw was ``in error'' under CAA section 110(k)(6) in accordance with 
Chevron step 1. As previously discussed, ``error'' should be defined 
broadly to include any mistake, and approval of a flawed SIP is a 
mistake.
    Even if the term ``error'' is not considered unambiguously to 
encompass the mistake that EPA made in approving the PSD SIPs under 
Chevron step 1, and instead is considered ambiguous on this question, 
then under Chevron step 2 EPA has sufficient discretion to determine 
that its approval action meets the definition of ``error.'' That is, 
under CAA section 110(k)(6), both the breadth of the term ``error'' and 
the authorization for EPA to ``determine[ ]''--which is a directive 
that is inherently discretionary--when it made an error, point towards 
EPA having sufficient discretion to identify the mismatch in the SIPs 
as a flaw and to identify its action in approving the PSD SIPs in the 
face of that mismatch as an error under that provision.
b. Narrowing of Approval
    Under CAA section 110(k)(6), once EPA determines that its action in 
approving the PSD SIPs was in error, EPA has the authority to correct 
the error in an ``appropriate'' manner, and through the same process as 
the original approval, but without requiring any further state 
submission. The term ``appropriate'' is open-ended, and therefore 
confers broad discretion upon EPA to fashion a reasonable type of 
correction. More generally, CAA section 110(k)(6) authorizes EPA to 
``determine[ ]'' that its action was in error, and does not direct or 
constrain that determination in any manner. That is, the provision does 
not identify any factors that EPA must, or may not, consider in making 
the determination. This further indicates that this provision confers 
broad discretion upon EPA.
    EPA's action corrects the error by rescinding EPA's approval of the 
PSD threshold provisions to the extent they apply PSD requirements to 
sources of GHG emissions below the final Tailoring Rule thresholds. 
Correcting the error in this fashion is appropriate because it narrows 
the approval to the PSD requirements to the extent they apply to GHG-
emitting sources at or above the final Tailoring Rule thresholds. This 
approach (i) renders the PSD applicability provisions consistent with 
EPA regulations and (ii) solves the mismatch previously described by 
assuring that SIP PSD applicability to GHG sources is consistent with 
EPA's interpretation of the scope of the state assurances of adequate 
resources for PSD administration.
    Correcting the error in this fashion--narrowing the approval of 
SIPs--is also consistent with the approach that the affected states are 
taking to administer PSD to GHG-emitting sources. The states have 
advised EPA that they are proceeding to develop SIP revisions to 
implement the Tailoring Rule and thereby narrow their SIP PSD programs 
to GHG-emitting sources at or above the Tailoring Rule thresholds. 
EPA's record in the Tailoring Rule indicates that the states should 
have adequate resources to implement their PSD program for GHG-emitting 
sources at the Tailoring Rule thresholds. In contrast, no state has 
informed EPA that it prefers to maintain its PSD applicability at the 
100/250 tpy level and that it intends to acquire the additional 
resources to do so.
    At this time, EPA is not further addressing, and therefore is not 
rescinding its approval of, the affected SIPs' PSD applicability 
provisions to the extent they remain unconstrained in the manner in 
which they incorporate newly regulated pollutants in respects other 
than PSD applicability to GHG-emitting sources below the Tailoring Rule 
thresholds. As a procedural matter, EPA did not propose to do so in the 
Tailoring Rule proposal and EPA did not receive any comments indicating 
that it should do so. In addition, CAA section 110(k)(6) gives EPA the 
authority to make corrections ``as appropriate.'' This language 
provides EPA with discretion to choose how to make corrections. The 
current problem resulting from EPA's erroneous approvals of the SIPs in 
question is limited to the regulation of GHG emissions, and the current 
rule addresses this problem. The scope of this action does not 
foreclose further action to address EPA's error in the future. An 
agency may properly address an issue in step-by-step fashion. See, 
e.g., Grand Canyon Air Tour Coalition v. F.A.A., 154 F.3d 455 (DC Cir. 
1998), City of Las Vegas v. Lujan, 891 F.2d 927 (DC Cir. 1989). 75 FR 
at 31544.
    In accordance with CAA section 110(k)(6), EPA has conducted this 
narrowing of approval through notice-and-comment rulemaking, which is 
the same manner as EPA conducted the prior approval.
2. Reconsideration Under CAA Section 301 and Case Law
    In the alternative to the error correction under CAA section 
110(k)(6) discussed above, EPA is using its authority to reconsider its 
prior approval actions in order to narrow its approval of the SIPs at 
issue. This authority lies in CAA section 301(a), read in conjunction 
with CAA section 110(k) and other statutory provisions, and case law 
holding that an agency has inherent authority to reconsider its prior 
actions.
    EPA approved some of the SIP PSD provisions affected by this rule 
prior to 1990, under the authority of CAA section 110 as it read prior 
to amendment by the 1990 CAA Amendments. Prior to the amendments, CAA 
section 110(a)(2) authorized EPA to ``approve or disapprove [a SIP], or 
any portion thereof.'' EPA approved the rest of the SIP PSD provisions 
affected by this rule after 1990, i.e., under the authority of CAA 
section 110(k)(3)-(4) as added by the 1990 CAA Amendments. These 
sections authorize EPA to approve a SIP submittal ``as a whole,'' 
``approve [the SIP submittal] in part and disapprove [it] in part,'' or 
issue a ``conditional approval'' of a SIP submittal. CAA section 
110(k)(3)-(4).
    In approving the SIPs under either CAA section 110(a)(2) as it read 
prior to 1990 or CAA section 110(k), EPA retained inherent authority to 
revise that action. The courts have found that an administrative agency 
has the inherent authority to reconsider its decisions, unless Congress 
specifically proscribes the agency's discretion to do so. See, e.g., 
Gun South, Inc. v. Brady, 877 F.2d 858, 862 (11th Cir. 1989) (holding 
that agencies have implied authority to reconsider and rectify errors 
even though the applicable statute and regulations do not provide 
expressly for such reconsideration); Trujillo v. General Electric Co., 
621 F.2d 1084, 1086 (10th Cir. 1980) (``Administrative agencies have an 
inherent authority to

[[Page 82545]]

reconsider their own decisions, since the power to decide in the first 
instance carries with it the power to reconsider'').
    Section 301(a) of the CAA, read in conjunction with CAA section 110 
and the case law just described, provides statutory authority for EPA's 
reconsideration action in this rulemaking. Section 301(a) of the CAA 
authorizes EPA ``to prescribe such regulations as are necessary to 
carry out [EPA's] functions'' under the CAA. Reconsidering prior 
rulemakings, when necessary, is part of `` [EPA's] functions'' under 
the CAA--in light of EPA's inherent authority as recognized under the 
case law to do so--and as a result, CAA section 301(a) confers 
authority upon EPA to undertake this rulemaking.
    EPA finds further support for its authority to narrow its approvals 
in APA section 553(e), which requires EPA to give interested persons 
``the right to petition for the issuance, amendment, or repeal of a 
rule,'' and CAA section 307(b)(1), which expressly contemplates that 
persons may file a petition for reconsideration under certain 
circumstances (at the same time that a rule is under judicial review). 
These authorizations for other persons to petition EPA to amend or 
repeal a rule suggest that EPA has inherent authority, on its own, to 
issue such amendment or repeal. This is because EPA may grant a 
petition from another person for an amendment to or repeal of a rule 
only if justified under the CAA, and if such an amendment or repeal is 
justified under the CAA, then EPA should be considered as having 
inherent authority to initiate the process on its own, even without a 
petition from another person.
    EPA recently used its authority to reconsider prior actions and 
limit its prior approval of a SIP in connection with California 
conformity SIPs. See, e.g., 68 FR 15720, 15723 (discussing prior action 
taken to limit approvals); 67 FR 69139 (taking final action to amend 
prior approvals to limit their duration); 67 FR 46618 (proposing to 
amend prior approvals to limit their duration, based on CAA sections 
110(k) and 301(a)). EPA had previously approved SIPs with emissions 
budgets based on a mobile source model that was current at the time of 
EPA's approval. Later, EPA updated the mobile source model. But, even 
though the model had been updated, emissions budgets would continue to 
be based on the older, previously approved model in the SIPs, rather 
than the updated model. To rectify this problem, EPA conducted a 
rulemaking that revised the previous SIP approvals so that the 
approvals of the emissions budgets would expire early, when the new 
ones were submitted by states and found adequate, rather than when a 
SIP revision was approved. This helped California more quickly adjust 
its regulations to incorporate the newer model. In this rule, EPA is 
using its authority to reconsider and narrow its prior approval of SIPs 
generally in the same manner as it did in connection with California 
conformity SIPs.

V. Comments and Responses

    In this section, we provide responses to comments we received on 
the proposed Tailoring Rule on narrowing EPA's approval of some SIPs. 
Several industry commenters (4095, 4106, 4118, 4691, 4870, 5083, 5058, 
5131, 5133, 5137, 5140, 5179, 5181, 5278, 5317, 5713, 6414, 16411) and 
state commenters (2729, 4019, 4866, 4989, 5039, 5084) object to our 
proposal to narrow our approval of previously fully approved SIPs. One 
industry commenter (4298) supports our proposal, though would like EPA 
to take additional actions as well. An environmental commenter (5306) 
also believes that EPA should accompany its proposed actions with a SIP 
call.

A. Comments Regarding the Legal Mechanism for the Current Action

    Commenters argued that neither CAA section 110(k)(6) error 
correction authority nor EPA's general authority under CAA 301(a) and 
APA 553(e) support the action EPA now takes. The arguments opposing 
both legal mechanisms for this rule include the following:
     The EPA's CAA section 110(k)(6) justification is flawed 
because section 110(k)(6) authority is limited to the correction of 
technical or clerical errors made in a SIP approval and does not allow 
any unilateral revision by EPA of substantive provisions or any changes 
to the nature or terms of a SIP that EPA has approved in the past. 
(2797, 4019, 4866, 4870, 4989, 5039, 5083, 5133, 5131, 5140, 5179, 
5181, 5279, 5317, 6414)
     The type of action EPA wishes to undertake can only be 
taken through a SIP call under section 110(k)(5) of the CAA, although 
that section is not applicable in this situation because SIPs that 
incorporate the CAA applicability thresholds are not inadequate to 
``comply with any requirement of the Act.'' (4106, 4691, 4870, 5058, 
5140, 5181, 5278, 5317, 6414)
     The EPA's retroactive limitation on its prior approval of 
the SIPs is not being done to correct a mistake--even EPA does not 
claim its approvals were in error at the time it promulgated them. 
Rather, the Agency is trying to change the SIPs now to avoid 
substantive and timing problems it has created by its own deliberate 
actions. (4870, 5058, 5131, 5140, 5181, 5278, 5317, 6414)
     The EPA is not proposing to correct any ``error'' ``in the 
same manner'' as it made its approval. The proposed Tailoring Rule in 
effect proposes a blanket narrowing on all past approvals; EPA is not 
issuing an individualized new proposed approval (or disapproval) action 
for each SIP that had been the subject of an individual EPA notice-and-
comment SIP approval proceeding. A SIP call is the proper procedure to 
address any alleged inadequacies in state resources. (2797, 4989, 5181, 
5317)
     In Concerned Citizens of Bridesburg v. EPA, 836 F.2d 777 
(3d Cir. 1987), the court invalidated EPA's attempt to rescind approval 
of a SIP revision that EPA had approved 13 years earlier on grounds 
that EPA's original approval was in error. The Court explained that in 
fact the SIP approval was no longer consistent with EPA policy due to 
an intervening change in that policy, and that the SIP approval was not 
an inadvertent mistake that would justify a unilateral change in 
disregard of procedural requirements for SIP revisions. Some commenters 
state that in order to be a mistake under Bridesburg, the original SIP 
approval must have been contrary to agency policy at the time of the 
SIP approval. One commenter also cited Detroit Edison Co. v. EPA, 496 
F.2d 244, 248-49 (6th Cir. 1974) in support of its argument that a 
substantive change to a SIP is a change in policy rather than a 
correction of an inadvertent mistake, and EPA cannot implement such a 
policy change in a SIP unilaterally (a proposed clarification by EPA of 
a SIP several months after promulgation was not in fact a clarification 
but a revision because it effected substantive change). (4870, 5080, 
5140, 5181, 5278, 5317)
     The EPA's invocation of section 110(k)(6) establishes a 
troubling precedent that undermines the role of states under the CAA. 
The EPA's approach is unguided by any standards, criteria, or 
precedent. States and regulated sources would no longer have confidence 
that they could rely on approved SIPs, safe from EPA's revision of 
those SIPs whenever the Agency decides--on any grounds it chooses or no 
grounds at all--that its prior approval had been an ``error.'' Under 
this interpretation of section 110(k)(6), EPA could dispense entirely 
with SIP calls under section 110(k)(5) and the states' role in SIP 
revisions, which was clearly not what Congress had in mind when it 
enacted section 110(k). The EPA's approach seriously undermines the 
carefully crafted federal-state

[[Page 82546]]

partnership the CAA creates, which assigns states the primary role in 
designing SIPs, while giving EPA a more limited, reviewing role. (4870, 
5039, 5140, 5181, 5278, 5317)
     The EPA has overstated its authority under CAA section 
301(a). The District of Columbia Circuit (DC Circuit) has observed that 
CAA section 301(a)(1) ``does not provide the Administrator with carte 
blanche authority to promulgate any rules, on any matter relating to 
the CAA, in any manner that the Administrator wishes.'' Where the CAA 
includes express provisions--such as section 110(k)(5) (the SIP call 
provision)--EPA is required to follow those provisions. If there was a 
mistake in prior SIP approvals as EPA contends, section 110(k)(5) is 
EPA's sole and exclusive mechanism for seeking to correct a SIP that 
has been determined to be inadequate. (4019, 4866, 4870, 5058, 5083, 
5131, 5140, 5181, 5278, 5317, 5714)
     The EPA's invocation of 5 U.S.C. 553(e) is legally 
indefensible. The EPA has mentioned no outstanding petition for EPA to 
revisit its PSD SIP approvals, so section 553(e) appears to be 
inapposite. In addition, CAA section 307(d)(1)(B) and the penultimate 
sentence of section 307(d)(1) expressly state that the provisions of 
section 553 do not apply to ``the promulgation or revision of an 
implementation plan by the Administrator'' under CAA section 110(c), 
which, in practical effect, is the action EPA proposes here. Even where 
section 553(e) applies, it merely directs agencies to allow parties to 
seek revisions of rules; it plainly does not permit agencies to 
disregard procedural requirements--whether under the APA or under 
organic statutes such as the CAA--that agencies must follow in 
effecting any such revisions. (5317, 5714)
    As previously discussed, EPA's error correction authority under CAA 
section 110(k)(6) and, in the alternative, CAA section 301, read in 
light of EPA's general authority to reconsider its actions, support the 
action EPA now takes to narrow its prior approval of some states' SIPs. 
The SIP call process is a distinct and separate authority that Congress 
has given to EPA for use when EPA determines that a current SIP is 
substantially inadequate to attain or maintain compliance with the CAA 
requirements. This process is a means for EPA to require state action. 
See, e.g., Sierra Club v. Georgia Power Company, 443 F.3d 1346, 1348 
(11th Cir. 2006) (describing the SIP call process generally as a means 
to state action). Congress explicitly laid out EPA's error correction 
authority under CAA section 110(k)(6), as a means for EPA to 
unilaterally reconsider its own prior actions without using a SIP call. 
EPA's general reconsideration authority also applies to EPA's 
reconsideration of its own actions.
    Sections 110(k)(5) and (6) of the CAA are intended to address 
different types of problems with SIPs. Section 110(k)(6) targets 
``error[s]'' that EPA made at the time it approved the SIP. Thus, EPA 
may rely on CAA section 110(k)(6) when EPA's own action--e.g., its 
original approval of a state's SIP--is erroneous. In contrast, section 
110(k)(5) targets ``substantial [ ] inadequa[cies]'' that prevent the 
SIP's compliance with CAA requirements and that exist in the SIP at the 
time of the SIP call regardless of when the substantial inadequacy 
first arose. Thus, a SIP whose approval was appropriate at the time but 
later may be shown to contain substantial inadequacies could be amended 
by the state using a SIP call under CAA section 100(k)(5), but could 
not be corrected by EPA under CAA section 110(k)(6).
    Even so, many circumstances may arise where either a CAA section 
110(k)(6) correction or a section 110(k)(5) SIP call could be 
appropriate. These are situations in which EPA erred in approving a SIP 
because the SIP was flawed, and that flaw constitutes a substantial 
inadequacy that prevents the SIP's compliance with a CAA requirement. 
Under these circumstances, EPA may choose between CAA section 110(k)(6) 
or section 110(k)(5), and nothing in either of those provisions 
precludes EPA from choosing to use the other one in the case of an 
overlap. Section 110(k)(6) of the CAA provides that ``[w]henever the 
Administrator determines that [a specified action] was in error, the 
Administrator may * * * revise such action* * *.'' This provision 
grants discretion to the Administrator to make the indicated 
determination (including the timing of the determination) and then 
grants the Administrator the discretion (``may'') to revise the action. 
No other provision in CAA section 110(k)(6), and none in section 
110(k)(5), precludes that discretion in a situation in which the 
Administrator could have instead relied on section 110(k)(5). By the 
same token, CAA section 110(k)(5) provides that ``[w]henever the 
Administrator finds that the applicable implementation plan for any 
area is substantially inadequate * * * to * * * comply with any 
requirement of [the CAA], the Administrator shall require [a SIP 
revision].'' This provision also grants discretion to the Administrator 
to make the indicated finding (including the timing of the finding) 
that would trigger the requirement for a SIP revision. No other 
provision in CAA section 110(k)(5) mandates that the Administrator make 
the finding (and thereby trigger the requirement for a SIP revision) 
even if the Administrator could otherwise rely on section 110(k)(6). 
See also New York Public Interest Research Group v. Whitman, 321 F.3d 
316, 330-31 (2d Cir. 2003) (finding that opening phrase ``Whenever the 
Administrator makes a determination'' in CAA section 502(i)(1) grants 
EPA ``discretion whether to make a determination''); Her Majesty the 
Queen in Right of Ontario v. U.S. E.P.A., 912 F.2d 1525, 1533 (DC Cir. 
1990) (finding ``whenever'' in CAA section 115(a) ``impl[ied] a degree 
of discretion'' in whether EPA had to make an endangerment finding). 
Indeed, if, as commenters suggest, section 110(k)(5) were viewed as 
predominating over section 110(k)(6), then there would be very few 
circumstances under which section 110(k)(6) would be available because 
in many instances, the type of error that the Administrator would see 
fit to correct under section 110(k)(6) would be one that would cause a 
SIP to be ``substantially inadequate'' to meet CAA requirements. Such a 
narrow role for section 110(k)(6) is inconsistent with its plain 
language, which, again, authorizes its usage ``whenever'' the 
Administrator ``determines'' that EPA's action was in ``error.'' As 
previously noted, the term ``error'' should be defined broadly to 
include any unintentional mistake, and the other quoted terms 
inherently provide discretion.
    In addition to Congress's explicit grant of error correction 
authority, the DC Circuit recently affirmed EPA's inherent authority to 
reconsider its own actions in New Jersey v. EPA, 517 F.3d 574 (DC Cir. 
2008), where it explained that an agency normally can change its 
position and reverse a prior decision. However, the Court added that 
``when Congress has provided a mechanism capable of rectifying mistaken 
actions * * * it is not reasonable to infer authority to reconsider 
agency action.'' New Jersey, 517 F.3d at 583. In that case, the Court 
did find that Congress had, in fact, limited EPA's ability to remove 
sources from the list of HAP source categories, once listed, by 
requiring EPA to follow the specific delisting process at CAA section 
112(c)(9).
    In the present case, EPA believes that it has the general authority 
under the CAA to reconsider its previous actions. Congress has also 
added the specific provision CAA section 110(k)(6), which authorizes 
correction of errors. EPA

[[Page 82547]]

believes that this error correction provision authorizes this action. 
If section 110(k)(6) has the breadth that EPA believes it has, then it 
may take the place of EPA's inherent authority to reconsider prior 
erroneous actions. If section 110(k)(6) has a more limited breadth and 
does not apply to this action, then EPA continues to have inherent 
authority to make corrections beyond what section 110(k)(6) authorizes, 
including this action.
    As previously discussed, EPA finds support for its general 
authority to reconsider under CAA section 301(a). However, we are not 
relying on CAA section 301(a) as carte blanche authority to promulgate 
any rules; rather, we are relying on CAA section 301(a) because this 
action carries out EPA's functions, to reconsider its action under CAA 
section 110 in approving SIP revisions, as authorized under the case 
law previously cited. Likewise, EPA finds some support for its 
authority in APA section 553(e). However, EPA is not relying on APA 
section 553(e) as direct authority for this action, under which EPA is 
correcting an error. Rather, EPA considers APA section 553(e) to 
support the proposition -- also supported by case law--that EPA has 
inherent authority to correct an error. Similarly to the APA, CAA 
section 307(b)(1), which contemplates petitions for reconsideration by 
EPA of actions taken on SIP submissions, supports the proposition that 
EPA has inherent authority to reconsider prior decisions that were in 
error.
    Commenters' concerns that EPA's approach to this rule seriously 
undermines the CAA federal-state partnership and the primary role given 
the states in the SIP development process are unfounded. This rule 
simply corrects an error in accordance with CAA section 110(k)(6); the 
primary role of states and the nature of the federal-state partnership 
certainly remains intact. States remain the developers and drafters of 
the SIPs; EPA remains the arbiter of whether the submitted SIP 
provisions meet necessary requirements, and thus should be part of the 
SIP. This federal-state partnership cannot preclude EPA from correcting 
errors in its own SIP approvals, and the partnership is not threatened 
by such error corrections. In addition, in accordance with CAA section 
110(k)(6), EPA exercises its authority under this provision through 
notice and comment rulemaking, in which states have the opportunity to 
comment in order to shape the outcome. Historically, EPA has exercised 
its authority under CAA section 110(k)(6) very sparingly and 
judiciously. In the current case, EPA has taken this action after close 
communication with the states.
    As previously discussed, the SIPs addressed here each contained a 
mismatch between their PSD applicability provisions and their state 
assurances of adequate resources. EPA erred in approving those SIPs. 
Since this error recently became apparent, EPA is now promptly taking 
steps to correct the error in a manner it deems appropriate. We find 
that use of our CAA section 110(k)(6) authority is appropriate because 
we are able to rectify the problem with the SIP without the need for 
state action, and because this approach provides the most efficient 
means for making the correction. Importantly, however, EPA is not 
basing its error correction on a change in its approach to an old 
policy, but rather on a flaw in the SIP that existed at the time of 
EPA's action on the SIP but which has only recently become apparent.
    Section 110(k)(6) of the CAA is available to correct any error in a 
SIP; EPA disagrees with the commenters who state that this provision 
may only be used for technical or clerical errors. As previously 
discussed, the text of CAA section 110(k)(6) applies the provision 
broadly to any mistake, and does not limit the provision's 
applicability to only technical or clerical errors. Congress's passage 
of CAA section 110(k)(6) in 1990 in fact indicated Congress's intent to 
reinforce EPA's broad authority to unilaterally correct any errors in 
SIP approvals, coming as it did after the Third Circuit adopted a 
narrow interpretation of error correction authority in Concerned 
Citizens of Bridesburg v. U.S. EPA, 836 F.2d 777 (1987).
    Conversely, commenters' concerns that this rule sets a troubling 
precedent because it is unguided by any standards, criteria or 
precedent are unfounded. This rule is based on a flaw in the relevant 
SIPs and EPA's error in approving the SIPs with that flaw. EPA's 
application of CAA section 110(k)(6) is, by the terms of that 
provision, limited to an error correction, and this action does not go 
beyond that limit.
    EPA conducted notice and comment on the approval-narrowing for each 
relevant SIP. This notice and comment process, followed by the issuance 
of the final rule, corrects the errors in these SIPs in the same manner 
that EPA previously approved the SIPs. EPA also made an individualized 
determination regarding each affected SIP that the SIP contains a 
mismatch between its PSD applicability and state assurances provisions. 
For each SIP, this mismatch has been made evident, as previously 
discussed, by (i) EPA's finding in the Tailoring Rule that under their 
current SIPs, the states would be required to process an enormous 
number of PSD permits for small GHG-emitting sources, which would 
overwhelm state resources; and (ii) the fact that no state has objected 
to this finding and asserted that it does have adequate resources, or 
that it previously assured EPA it would have adequate resources, for 
this purpose.
    EPA's narrowing of approval amounts to a revision to the federal 
SIP, but that is inherent in its ability to correct its SIP action 
under CAA section 110(k)(6). EPA is not changing the state law 
component of the SIP, which remains fully state enforceable.

B. Comments on Potential Triggering of Anti-Backsliding Provisions

    Some commenters expressed concern that anti-backsliding provisions 
would prevent revision of SIPs to increase the significance threshold 
for GHG emissions. Commenters were concerned that the EPA's approach to 
ask states to quickly revise their SIPs to comport with the increased 
significance thresholds is likely to be challenged by activist groups 
citing the CAA's anti-backsliding provisions, which limit relaxation in 
certain rules. Under EPA's interpretation of PSD applicability, once 
the LDVR requires PSD to apply to GHGs, the existing thresholds 
contained in SIPs could be alleged by activist groups to become binding 
on GHGs under the anti-backsliding arguments that these groups are 
currently advancing in various court cases. Thus, even if a state 
wanted to revise its regulations similarly to the federal Tailoring 
Rule and thereby relax the threshold, the anti-backsliding provision 
might prevent it. (5140, 5181, 5278). One commenter was also concerned 
more generally that anti-backsliding rules prevent EPA from 
``adjust[ing] greenhouse gas levels'' under the Tailoring Rule. (5713).
    None of these comments raised objections to this action narrowing 
EPA's prior approval of SIPs. Thus, it is not necessary to address 
these comments here. However, to the extent the concern expressed in 
these comments could have been raised by changes to SIPs resulting from 
EPA's narrowing of its prior approval, we choose to address the 
comments here in the interest of greater responsiveness.
    While many commenters did not clarify which CAA provisions they 
considered ``anti-backsliding provisions'', they most likely meant to 
refer to CAA sections 110(l), 110(n)(1), or 193. However, the current 
rule does not violate any of these provisions.

[[Page 82548]]

    Under CAA section 193, EPA may only modify any ``control 
requirement'' applicable to a nonattainment area that was required or 
in effect prior to November 15, 1990 if ``the modification insures 
equivalent or greater emission reductions of such air pollutant.'' 
These provisions of section 193 apply to controls for pollutants for 
which an area is designated nonattainment. No area of the country is 
designated nonattainment for GHGs. This rule prevents certain sources 
or modification projects that are not currently subject to PSD 
requirements from becoming subject to PSD due to their emissions of 
GHGs on January 2, 2010 when GHGs will become ``subject to regulation'' 
for purposes of the PSD program. GHGs are not currently subject to 
regulation under the PSD program. Furthermore, the PSD program does not 
require emission offsets for new or modified major sources, and EPA 
does not consider the PSD program to achieve ``emissions reductions'' 
for purposes of section 193. Rather, the program merely limits future 
emissions growth. Thus, section 193 would not limit alteration of a PSD 
program because any revised program would meet the statutory test. 
Therefore, the current rule does not violate CAA section 193.
    CAA section 110(l) provides that EPA shall not approve a SIP 
revision ``if the revision would interfere with any applicable 
requirement concerning attainment and reasonable further progress (as 
defined in [CAA section 171]), or any other applicable requirement of 
this chapter.'' CAA section 171 defines ``reasonable further progress'' 
as ``such annual incremental reductions in emissions of the relevant 
air pollutant as are required by this part or may reasonably be 
required by the Administrator for the purpose of ensuring attainment of 
the applicable national ambient air quality standard by the applicable 
date.'' The current rule does not approve a SIP revision. The current 
rule also would not interfere with attainment of any NAAQS, or with any 
other requirement of the CAA.
    CAA section 110(n)(1) states that a provision that was in a SIP 
prior to November 15, 1990 may only be changed if it is ``approved or 
promulgated by [EPA] pursuant to this chapter.'' The current rule is 
being approved by EPA pursuant to this chapter. The procedure of 
approval is pursuant to the CAA, and the rule's substance does not 
violate CAA section 110(l) or any other CAA provision.
    CAA section 172(e), which was cited specifically by one commenter, 
applies to EPA action to ``relax a [NAAQS] after November 15, 1990.'' 
Since GHGs are not a NAAQS pollutant and this rule does not change any 
NAAQS standard, this provision is not applicable to the current rule.

C. Comments on Persisting Practical Difficulties at the State Level

    EPA received comments that raised concern that EPA is ignoring the 
fact that it will take time for the states to amend their laws and 
regulations to accommodate the revised applicability thresholds. 
Commenters expressed concern that it will be of little help for EPA to 
quickly amend the relevant SIPs because states will still be bound to 
implement their underlying programs until corrections can be made. For 
sources, this means no relief from the statutory thresholds for a 
lengthy time after GHGs become regulated. (4019, 4095, 4866, 5080, 
5083, 5084, 5131, 5133, 5140, 5179, 5278, 5317, 16411)
    After this action is published and becomes effective, federal law 
will not require affected states to issue PSD permits for GHGs emitted 
at levels below the Tailoring Rule thresholds. Thus, sources in these 
states emitting GHGs below the Tailoring Rule thresholds will not be 
federally required to obtain a PSD permit for those emissions.
    No action by EPA can amend state law requirements, or relieve 
emitters of responsibilities under state law. However, most states 
affected by this rule have already begun the process of amending their 
state regulations to incorporate the Tailoring Rule thresholds. As 
previously noted, almost all states are on track to have changed their 
state law to incorporate the Tailoring Rule thresholds by January 2, 
2011 or very shortly thereafter. EPA encourages states to continue to 
pursue this process. Once states change their state law to incorporate 
the Tailoring Rule thresholds, then both the state law and federal law 
permitting requirements will be resolved. States can then process their 
revised state laws into SIP revisions and submit them for approval. In 
the proposed GHG PSD SIP Call preamble, EPA included recommendations 
for some states to streamline their SIP development processes; those 
recommendations could be used here. In the same proposal, EPA 
encouraged states to submit their SIP revisions for parallel 
processing, and thereby speed EPA approval. EPA recognizes that it may 
take some months to receive EPA approval of the SIP revision, but 
during this time, the State and Federal law will already each have been 
changed. This rule thus helps ensure that sources emitting GHGs at 
below-Tailoring Rule levels will have relief from GHG permitting 
requirements as early as possible.

D. Comments on Preferred Alternative Courses of Action

    EPA received comments advocating alternate courses of action to 
address SIPs with the 100/250 tpy thresholds for GHGs. These comments 
include the following:
     If EPA wishes to pursue its current regulatory strategy, 
it could amend the minimum PSD SIP elements in 40 CFR 51.166 and allow 
states to develop and submit SIP revisions in accordance with those new 
provisions. (5182, 5317)
     The EPA should exercise all available legal authority to 
ensure that SIPs come into conformity with the Tailoring Rule. Instead 
of taking no action other than to limit approval of SIPs, EPA should 
mandate or strongly encourage states to revise their PSD rules to 
reflect the higher thresholds. This could be accomplished through an 
expedited SIP call or by conditioning section 105 grant funding on 
appropriate revisions to the PSD rules in SIP-approved states. (4691)
     An industry commenter (4298) supports EPA's efforts to 
narrow or conform its prior approvals through CAA sections 301(a)(1) 
and 110(k)(6) with respect to applicability thresholds. However, the 
commenter believes EPA should take affirmative steps to ensure that 
states immediately either revise their regulations to raise existing 
lower thresholds or demonstrate that they have adequate resources and 
funding to manage their programs utilizing those existing lower 
thresholds. The commenter also believes that EPA should not finalize 
any action that would trigger GHG permitting until each state program 
has been amended (4298).
     An environmental group commenter (5306) believes that EPA 
and the states should collaborate on an expeditious, smooth transition 
in carrying out obligations to address GHGs under the PSD programs. The 
commenter believes it is reasonable for EPA to call for a SIP revision 
under section 110(k)(5) with an expeditious deadline for states to 
submit corrective plan revisions. Further, according to the commenter, 
EPA can ease state adoption of PSD permit program revisions and 
expedite EPA's own review and approval of the states' adjustments by 
adopting model guidelines to help inform state rulemaking. The 
commenter recommends that EPA should promptly start the process with 
the aim to complete it by the end of 2010.

[[Page 82549]]

    As previously noted, EPA is strongly encouraging states to amend 
their SIP requirements to conform to the PSD thresholds established in 
the final Tailoring Rule, and this rule is consistent with such action. 
In fact, many states have already begun the process of amending state 
regulations and submitting those changes to EPA for approval. EPA is 
working closely with many states to help complete this process as 
expeditiously as possible. This close interaction obviates the need for 
guidelines on how states might amend their laws. EPA's narrowing of our 
prior approval of some SIPs is intended to assure that at least the 
federal law component of these SIPs will, in essence, reflect the 
Tailoring Rule thresholds, since not all states whose SIPs will cover 
GHGs on January 2, 2011 will be able to amend their SIP thresholds by 
that date.
    EPA does not feel that a SIP call would provide any additional 
benefit over the current action. Since the affected states are already 
making efforts to change their state laws and amend their SIPs, and 
have already informed EPA about their plans to make these changes in a 
time-effective manner, a SIP call would not spur any action that is not 
already occurring.
    Neither this action nor the Tailoring Rule triggered GHG permitting 
for any state. The Light Duty Vehicle Rule, in conjunction with the 
operation of the Clean Air Act, has already triggered the applicability 
of PSD to GHG emitting sources.

VI. Effective Date

    This rule is being issued under CAA Sec.  307(d)(1)(V). CAA section 
307(d) specifies that rules issued under its provisions are not subject 
to APA section 553. Thus, the 30-day delay in effective date from the 
date of signature required under the APA does not apply. In addition, 
even if APA section 553 were to apply, APA section 553(d) provides an 
exception for any action that grants or recognizes an exemption or 
relieves a restriction. Since the effect of this rule will be to 
relieve many small sources (and permitting authorities) from certain 
PSD obligations, EPA believes that an immediate effective date is 
consistent with the purposes under APA section 553(d). EPA believes 
there is good cause for an immediate effective date due to the 
regulatory confusion that would result if states were federally 
required to implement PSD GHG permitting at only the statutory 
thresholds starting on January 2, 2010. In addition, since this is not 
a major rule under the Congressional Review Act, the 60-day delay in 
effective date required for major rules under the CRA does not apply. 
This rule is thus effective immediately.

VII. Statutory and Executive Orders

A. Executive Order 12866--Regulatory Planning and Review

    Under Executive Order (EO) 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), 
this action is a ``significant regulatory action'' because it raises 
novel legal or policy issues. Accordingly, EPA submitted this action to 
the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review under EO 12866 and 
any changes made in response to OMB recommendations have been 
documented in the docket for this action.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act

    This action does not impose any new information collection burden. 
Instead, this action will significantly reduce costs incurred by 
sources and permitting authorities relative to the costs that would be 
incurred if EPA did not revise this rule. In the final Tailoring Rule, 
EPA stated that based on its GHG threshold data analysis, it estimated 
that over 80,000 new and modified facilities per year, nationally, 
would be subject to PSD review based on applying a GHG emissions 
threshold of 100/250 tpy using a CO2e metric. This was 
compared with the 280 PSD permits currently issued per year. Thus, 
without the final Tailoring Rule, the administrative burden for 
permitting GHG emissions would increase 280-fold, an unmanageable 
increase. The current action takes further steps to implement the 
burden-reduction implemented by the final Tailoring Rule.
    In addition, OMB has previously approved the information collection 
requirements contained in the existing regulations for PSD (see, e.g., 
40 CFR 52.21) under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 
U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and has assigned OMB control number 2060-0003. The 
OMB control numbers for EPA's regulations in 40 CFR are listed in 40 
CFR part 9.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The RFA generally requires an agency to prepare a regulatory 
flexibility analysis of any rule subject to notice and comment 
rulemaking requirements under the APA or any other statute unless the 
agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities. Small entities 
include small businesses, small organizations, and small governmental 
jurisdictions.
    For purposes of assessing the impacts of this final action on small 
entities, small entity is defined as: (1) A small business that is a 
small industrial entity as defined in the U.S. SBA size standards (see 
13 CFR 121.201); (2) a small governmental jurisdiction that is a 
government of a city, county, town, school district, or special 
district with a population of less than 50,000; or (3) a small 
organization that is any not-for-profit enterprise that is 
independently owned and operated and is not dominant in its field.
    After considering the economic impacts of this final rule on small 
entities, I certify that this final action will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. In 
determining whether a rule has a significant economic impact on a 
substantial number of small entities, the impact of concern is any 
significant adverse economic impact on small entities, since the 
primary purpose of the regulatory flexibility analyses is to identify 
and address regulatory alternatives which ``minimize any significant 
economic impact of the * * * rule on small entities.'' 5 U.S.C. 603 and 
604. Thus, an agency may certify that a rule will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities 
if the rule relieves regulatory burden, or otherwise has a positive 
economic effect on all of the small entities subject to the rule.
    We have therefore concluded that this final rule will relieve the 
federal regulatory burden for most affected small entities associated 
with the major PSD permit programs for new or modified major sources 
that emit GHGs, including small businesses, in the affected states. 
This is because this rule narrows its approval of SIPs in affected 
states so as to raise the approved PSD applicability thresholds for 
sources that emit GHGs. As a result, the program changes provided in 
this rule are not expected to result in a significant economic impact 
on a substantial number of small entities.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

    This rule does not contain a federal mandate that may result in 
expenditures of $100 million or more for state, local, and tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or the private sector in any 1 year. No 
state will have an increased burden as a result of this rule; any 
burden related to amending state SIPs to incorporate different GHG 
emissions thresholds resulted from the final Tailoring Rule, not the 
current rule. Thus, this rule is not subject to the requirements of 
sections 202 or 205 of Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA).

[[Page 82550]]

    This rule is also not subject to the requirements of section 203 of 
UMRA because it contains no regulatory requirements that might 
significantly or uniquely affect small governments. This rule is 
expected to result in cost savings and an administrative burden 
reduction for all permitting authorities and permittees in the affected 
states, including small governments.

E. Executive Order 13132--Federalism

    This action does not have federalism implications. It will not have 
substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between 
the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as 
specified in Executive Order 13132. This final rule will ultimately 
simplify and reduce the burden on state and local agencies associated 
with implementing the PSD permit program, by ensuring that, in affected 
states, a source whose GHG emissions are below the final Tailoring Rule 
thresholds will not have to obtain a PSD permit under federal law. 
Thus, Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this action.
    In the spirit of Executive Order 13132, and consistent with EPA 
policy to promote communications between EPA and state and local 
governments, EPA specifically solicited comments on the proposed rule 
from state and local officials. EPA has also consulted with the 
National Association of Clean Air Agencies and representatives from 
some individual states in developing this rule.

F. Executive Order 13175--Consultation and Coordination With Indian 
Governments

    Subject to Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000) 
EPA may not issue a regulation that has tribal implications, that 
imposes substantial direct compliance costs, and that is not required 
by statute, unless the federal government provides the funds necessary 
to pay the direct compliance costs incurred by tribal governments, or 
EPA consults with tribal officials early in the process of developing 
the proposed regulation and develops a tribal summary impact statement.
    EPA has concluded that this action may have tribal implications. 
However, it will neither impose substantial direct compliance costs on 
tribal government, nor preempt tribal law. There are no tribal 
authorities currently issuing major NSR permits; however, this may 
change in the future.
    EPA consulted with tribal officials early in the process of 
developing the final Tailoring Rule regulation, which the current rule 
helps to implement, to allow them to have meaningful and timely input 
into its development. Prior to publishing the proposed Tailoring Rule, 
EPA published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) that 
included GHG tailoring options for regulating GHGs under the CAA. (73 
FR 44354, July 30, 2008). As a result of the ANPR, EPA received several 
comments from tribal officials on differing GHG tailoring options 
presented in the ANPR which were considered in the proposed Tailoring 
Rule and final Tailoring Rule. Additionally, EPA also specifically 
solicited comment from tribal officials on the proposed Tailoring Rule 
(74 FR 55292, October 27, 2009) in which the actions which EPA now 
takes were first proposed.

G. Executive Order 13045--Protection of Children From Environmental 
Health and Safety Risks

    EPA interprets Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) 
as applying only to those regulatory actions that concern health or 
safety risks, such that the analysis required under section 5-501 of 
the Executive 492 Order has the potential to influence the regulation. 
This action is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it does not 
establish an environmental standard intended to mitigate health or 
safety risks.

H. Executive Order 13211--Actions That Significantly Affect Energy 
Supply, Distribution, or Use

    This action is not a ``significant energy action'' as defined in 
Executive Order 13211 (66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001)), because it is not 
likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, 
distribution, or use of energy. Further, we have concluded that this 
rule is not likely to have any adverse energy effects because this 
action would not create any new requirements for sources in the energy 
supply, distribution, or use sectors.

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

    Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement 
Act of 1995 (``NTTAA''), Public Law 104-113, 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) 
directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its regulatory 
activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or 
otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards are technical 
standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, sampling 
procedures, and business practices) that are developed or adopted by 
voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA to provide 
Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides not to use 
available and applicable voluntary consensus standards.
    This action does not involve technical standards. Therefore, EPA 
did not consider the use of any voluntary consensus standards.

J. Executive Order 12898--Federal Actions To Address Environmental 
Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations

    Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629 (Feb. 16, 1994)) establishes 
federal executive policy on environmental justice. Its main provision 
directs federal agencies, to the greatest extent practicable and 
permitted by law, to make environmental justice part of their mission 
by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high 
and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, 
policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income 
populations in the United States.
    EPA has concluded that it is not practicable to determine whether 
there would be disproportionately high and adverse human health or 
environmental effects on minority and/or low income populations from 
this rule. This rule is necessary in order to allow for the continued 
implementation of permitting requirements established in the CAA. 
Specifically, without this rule, the affected states' CAA PSD 
permitting programs would become overwhelmed and unmanageable by the 
untenable number of GHG sources that would become newly subject to 
them. This would result in severe impairment of the functioning of 
these programs with potentially adverse human health and environmental 
effects nationwide. Under this rule and the findings under the final 
Tailoring Rule, EPA is ensuring that the affected states' CAA 
permitting programs continue to operate by narrowing their 
applicability to the maximum number of sources the programs can 
possibly handle. This approach is consistent with congressional intent 
as it phases in applicability, starting with the largest sources 
initially, and then other sources over time, so as not to overwhelm 
state permitting programs. By doing so, this rule allows for the 
maximum degree of environmental protection possible while providing 
regulatory relief for the unmanageable burden that would otherwise 
exist. Therefore, we believe it is not practicable to identify and 
address disproportionately high and adverse human health or 
environmental effects on minority populations and low

[[Page 82551]]

income populations in the United States under this final rule, though 
we do believe that this rule will ensure that states can continue to 
issue PSD permits to significant sources of air pollution.

K. Congressional Review Act

    The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by 
SBREFA, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the 
agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes 
a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the 
Comptroller General of the United States. EPA will submit a report 
containing this rule and other required information to the U.S. Senate, 
the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the 
United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. 
A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in 
the Federal Register. This action is not a ``major rule'' as defined by 
5 U.S.C. 804(2). This rule will be effective December 30, 2010.

L. Judicial Review

    Section 307(b)(1) of the CAA specifies which Federal Courts of 
Appeal have jurisdiction to hear petitions for review of which final 
actions by EPA. This section provides, in part, that petitions for 
review must be filed in the Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia Circuit: (i) When the agency action consists of ``nationally 
applicable regulations promulgated, or final actions taken, by the 
Administrator,'' or (ii) when such action is locally or regionally 
applicable, if ``such action is based on a determination of nationwide 
scope or effect and if in taking such action the Administrator finds 
and publishes that such action is based on such a determination.''
    This rule narrowing EPA's previous approvals of SIPs in 24 states 
to correct a flaw in those SIPs is ``nationally applicable'' within the 
meaning of section 307(b)(1). The circumstances that have led to this 
rulemaking are national in scope and are substantially the same for 
each affected state. They include EPA's promulgation of nationally 
applicable GHG requirements that, in conjunction with the operation of 
the CAA PSD provisions, have resulted in GHG-emitting sources becoming 
subject to PSD. Moreover, in this rule, EPA is applying uniform 
principles for each affected state in this rule. At the core of this 
rulemaking is EPA's recognition that when it approved each of the 
affected SIPs' PSD applicability provisions, it did so in the face of a 
mismatch--common to each SIP--between the breadth of those provisions 
and the scope of the resource assurances the states provided. EPA is 
now addressing this flaw in numerous SIPs across the country through 
the CAA section 110(k)(6) error correction provisions. EPA's analytical 
approach for each SIP is the same, its determination that each SIP was 
flawed and therefore that EPA erred in its approval of each SIP is the 
same, and EPA's remedial action of rescinding its previous approval of 
part of the SIP and thereby narrowing its approval of the SIP is the 
same. This rulemaking action is supported by a single administrative 
record, and does not involve factual questions unique to the different 
affected states. In addition, this rule applies to multiple States in 
numerous judicial circuits across the country.
    For similar reasons, this rule is based on determinations of 
nationwide scope or effect. EPA uses a uniform legal interpretation in 
all the affected States across the country; for the same reasons in 
each case, EPA is determining that each SIP was flawed and that EPA 
therefore erred in approving it. Similarly, EPA is determining that the 
appropriate remedial action is to rescind its approval in part and 
thereby narrow its approval, and this too is the same for each state. 
Because the states are spread across the nation, each of these 
determinations is nationwide in scope or effect. Moreover, EPA is 
making these determinations and promulgating this action within the 
context of nationwide rulemakings and interpretation of the applicable 
CAA provisions, as noted above.
    Thus, any petitions for judicial review of this action must be 
filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia Circuit by February 28, 2011. Any such judicial review is 
limited to only those objections that are raised with reasonable 
specificity in timely comments. Filing a petition for reconsideration 
by the Administrator of this final rule does not affect the finality of 
this rule for the purposes of judicial review nor does it extend the 
time within which a petition for judicial review may be filed, and 
shall not postpone the effectiveness of such rule or action. Under 
section 307(b)(2) of the Act, the requirements of this final action may 
not be challenged later in civil or criminal proceedings brought by us 
to enforce these requirements. Pursuant to section 307(d)(1)(V) of the 
Act, the Administrator determines that this action is subject to the 
provisions of section 307(d). Section 307(d)(1)(V) provides that the 
provisions of section 307(d) apply to ``such other actions as the 
Administrator may determine.'' This action finalizes elements of a 
previous proposed action--the Prevention of Significant Deterioration 
and Title V Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule Proposed Rule (74 FR 55292, 
October 27, 2009).

VIII. Statutory Authority

    The statutory authority for this action is provided by sections 
101, 110, and 301 of the CAA as amended (42 U.S.C. 7401, 7410, and 
7601). This action is also subject to section 307(d) of the CAA (42 
U.S.C. 7407(d)).

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52

    Administrative practice and procedure, Air pollution control, 
Carbon dioxide, Carbon dioxide equivalents, Environmental protection, 
Greenhouse gases, Hydrofluorocarbons, Incorporation by reference, 
Intergovernmental relations, Methane, Nitrous oxide, Perfluorocarbons, 
Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Sulfur hexafluoride.

    Dated: December 23, 2010.
Lisa P. Jackson,
Administrator.

0
For the reasons stated in the preamble, title 40, chapter I of the Code 
of Federal Regulations is amended as set forth below.

PART 52--[AMENDED]

0
1. The authority citation for part 52 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.

Subpart B--Alabama

0
2. Section 52.53 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.53  Approval Status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Alabama's plans for the attainment and 
maintenance of the national standards under section 110 of the Clean 
Air Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds the plans satisfy all 
requirements of Part D, Title I, of the Clean Air Act as amended in 
1977. In addition, continued satisfaction of the requirements of Part D 
for the ozone portion of the SIP depends on the adoption and submittal 
of RACT requirements by July 1, 1980 for the sources covered by CTGs 
issued between January 1978 and January 1979 and adoption and submittal 
by each subsequent January of additional RACT requirements for sources 
covered by CTGs issued by the previous January.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas

[[Page 82552]]

(GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that application only to 
the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this 
paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no action on that 
application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
EPA-approved Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) 
Rules 335-3-14-.04(1)(d) thru (i) and 335-3-14-.04(2)(u)) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in EPA-approved Alabama 
Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) Rules 335-3-14-.04(2)(c) 
and 335-3-14-.04(2)(w)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions 
increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated 
assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and 
``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in Alabama Department of Environmental Management 
(ADEM) Rules 335-3-14-.04(2)(w).

Subpart F--California

0
3. Section 52.223 is amended by adding paragraphs (f), (g), and (h) to 
read as follows:


Sec.  52.223  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (f)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in North Coast Unified Air Quality Management 
District's approved plan apply to stationary sources of greenhouse gas 
(GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that application only to 
the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this 
paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no action on that 
application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District 
rules at R1-1-130(s2)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in the North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District 
rules at R1-1-130(n1)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions 
increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated 
assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and 
``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in the EPA-approved North Coast Unified Air Quality 
Management District rules at R1-1-130(s2).
    (g)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control 
District's approved plan apply to stationary sources of greenhouse gas 
(GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that application only to 
the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this 
paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no action on that 
application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:

[[Page 82553]]

    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District 
rules at R1-1-130(s2)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in the Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District 
rules at R1-1-130(n1)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions 
increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated 
assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and 
``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in the EPA-approved Northern Sonoma County Air 
Pollution Control District rules at R1-1-130(s2).
    (h)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in Mendocino County Air Quality Management District's 
approved plan apply to stationary sources of greenhouse gas (GHGs) 
emissions, the Administrator approves that application only to the 
extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this 
paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no action on that 
application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved Mendocino County Air Quality Management District rules 
at R1-1-130(s2)) and a significant net emissions increase (as defined 
in the Mendocino County Air Quality Management District rules at R1-1-
130(m1) (1982)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase 
shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming 
the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is 
defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in 
the EPA-approved Mendocino County Air Quality Management District rules 
at R1-1-130(s2).

Subpart G--Colorado

0
4. Section 52.323 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.323  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Colorado's plan for the attainment and 
maintenance of the national standards under section 110 of the Clean 
Air Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds that the plan satisfies 
all requirements of Part D, Title 1, of the Clean Air Act as amended in 
1977, except as noted below.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) the term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:

[[Page 82554]]

    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
paragraphs I.A.2. through I.A.3, and I.B of Part D of Colorado's Air 
Quality Commission's Regulation Number 3) and a significant net 
emissions increase (as defined in paragraphs II.A.26 and II.A.42.a of 
Part D of Colorado's Air Quality Commission's Regulation Number 3) 
occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on 
tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant 
GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 
75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in paragraph 
II.A.42.b of Part D of Colorado's Air Quality Commission's Regulation 
Number 3.

Subpart L--Georgia

0
5. Section 52.572 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.572  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Georgia's plans for the attainment and 
maintenance of the national standards under section 110 of the Clean 
Air Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds the plans satisfy all 
requirements of Part D, Title I, of the Clean Air Act as amended in 
1977, except as noted below.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv) (2006) and the EPA-approved Georgia 
Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Rules 391-3-1-.02(7)(a)2.(I) 
thru (IV) (2006)) and a significant net emissions increase (as defined 
in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i) (2006)) occur. 40 CFR 52.21 (2006) 
is presently incorporated by reference into Georgia's approved plan at 
EPA-approved Georgia EPD Rule 391-3-1-.02(7). For the pollutant GHGs, 
an emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall 
be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, 
and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(23)(ii).

Subpart P--Indiana

0
6. Section 52.773 is amended by adding paragraph (k) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.773  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (k)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (k), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (k)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (k)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (k)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the

[[Page 82555]]

procedures in [326 IAC-2-2-2(d) of Indiana's Administrative Code) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in 326 IAC-2-1, 
paragraphs (ii) and (ww) of Indiana's Administrative Code) occur. For 
the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in paragraph 326 IAC 2-2-
1(ww)(1)(V) of Indiana's Administrative Code.

Subpart Q--Iowa

0
7. Section 52.822 is amended by adding paragraph (b) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.822  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i)) occur. For the pollutant 
GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and 
shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR 
pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e 
instead of applying the value in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(23)(ii) of this 
section.

Subpart T--Louisiana

0
8. Section 52.986 is amended by adding paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.986  Significant deterioration of air quality.

* * * * *
    (c)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in Louisiana's approved plan apply to stationary 
sources of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves 
that application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to 
regulation'', as provided in this paragraph (c), and the Administrator 
takes no action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not 
``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (c)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (c)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved Louisiana Administrative Code (LAC), Title 33, Part 
III, Chapter 5, Section 509, Subsection B) and a significant net 
emissions increase (as defined in LAC 33:III.509.B) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in the EPA-approved 
definition of ``significant'' at LAC 33:III.509.B.

Subpart U--Maine

0
9. Section 52.1022 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.1022  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Maine's plan, as identified in Sec.  52.1020, 
for the attainment and maintenance of the national standards under 
section 110 of the Clean Air Act.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas

[[Page 82556]]

(GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that application only to 
the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this 
paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no action on that 
application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
06-096 1. of Chapter 100 of Maine's Bureau of Air Quality Control 
regulations) and a significant net emissions increase (as defined in 
06-096, paragraphs 89 and 144 A of Chapter 100 of Maine's Bureau of Air 
Quality Control regulations) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an 
emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be 
calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, 
and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in 06-096, paragraphs 143 and 144 D of Chapter 100 
of Maine's Bureau of Air Quality Control regulations.

Subpart V--Maryland

0
10. Section 52.1073 is amended by adding paragraph (h) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.1073  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (h)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (h), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (h)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (h)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (h)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that a net significant 
emissions increase (as defined in 40 CFR part 52.21(b)(3)(i) (2000) and 
the EPA-approved Maryland rules at COMAR 26.11.06.14 (state effective 
date 10/10/2001)). For the pollutant GHGs, a net emissions increase 
shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming 
the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is 
defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in 
40 CFR 52.21(b)(23)(ii) (2000).

Subpart Z--Mississippi

0
11. Section 52.1272 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.1272  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Mississippi's plan for the attainment and 
maintenance of national standards under section 110 of the Clean Air 
Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds the plans satisfy all 
requirements of Part D, Title I, of the Clean Air Act as amended in 
1977.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation,'' 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of

[[Page 82557]]

this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv) (2007)) and a significant net emissions increase 
(as defined in paragraphs 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i) (2007)) 
occur. 40 CFR 52.21 (2007) is presently incorporated by reference into 
Mississippi's plan at EPA-approved Mississippi Commission on 
Environmental Quality Rule APC-S-5. For the pollutant GHGs, an 
emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be 
calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, 
and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(23)(ii)(2007).

Subpart AA--Missouri

0
12. Section 52.1323 is amended by adding paragraph (n) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.1323  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (n)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation,'' 
as provided in this paragraph (n), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (n)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (n)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (n)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i)) occur. For the pollutant 
GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and 
shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR 
pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e 
instead of applying the value in 40 CFR 52.21(b)(23)(ii).

Subpart EE--New Hampshire

0
13. Section 52.1522 is amended by adding paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.1522  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (c)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (c), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (c)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to

[[Page 82558]]

subpart A of 40 CFR part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (c)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in paragraphs 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i)) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in 40 CFR 
52.21(b)(23)(ii).

Subpart GG--New Mexico

0
14. Section 52.1634 is amended by adding paragraphs (d) and (e) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  52.1634  Significant deterioration of air quality.

* * * * *
    (d)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in New Mexico's approved plan apply to stationary 
sources of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves 
that application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to 
regulation'', as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator 
takes no action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not 
``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) rules at New 
Mexico Administrative Code (NMAC) 20.2.74.200, Subsection D) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in the EPA-approved NMED 
rules at NMAC 20.2.74.7, paragraphs (AK), (AV), and (AW)) occur. For 
the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in the EPA-approved NMED 
rules at Table 2 of NMAC 20.2.74.502.
    (e)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in Bernallilo County/City of Albuquerque's approved 
plan apply to stationary sources of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, 
the Administrator approves that application only to the extent that 
GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', as provided in this paragraph (b), 
and the Administrator takes no action on that application to the extent 
that GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the EPA-approved Bernallilo County/City of Albuquerque rules at NMAC 
20.11.61.11, Subsection D) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in the EPA-approved Bernanillo County/City of Albuquerque rules 
at NMAC 20.11.61.7, paragraphs (OO), (YY), and (ZZ)) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in the EPA-approved 
Bernallilo County/City of Albuquerque rules at Table 2 of NMAC 
20.11.61.27.

Subpart II--North Carolina

0
15. Section 52.1772 is amended by adding paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.1772  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (c)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)

[[Page 82559]]

provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (c), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (c)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (c)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that a significant net 
emissions increase (as defined in paragraphs 40 CFR 51.166(b)(3) (1996) 
and 40 CFR 51.166(b)(23)(i) (1996)) occurs. 40 CFR 51.166 (1996) is 
presently incorporated by reference into North Carolina's plan at EPA-
approved North Carolina Rule 15A NCAC 02D-.544. For the pollutant GHGs, 
an emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall 
be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, 
and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of 
applying the value in 40 CFR 51.166(b)(23)(ii) (1996).

Subpart KK--Ohio

0
16. Section 52.1873 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.1873  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart the Administrator 
approves Ohio's plan for the attainment and maintenance of the National 
Ambient Air Quality Standards under section 110 of the Clean Air Act. 
Furthermore, the Administrator finds the plan satisfies all the 
requirements of Part D, Title 1 of the Clean Air Act as amended in 
1977, except as noted below. In addition, continued satisfaction of the 
requirements of Part D for the ozone portion of the SIP depends on the 
adoption and submittal of RACT requirements by January 1, 1981 for the 
sources covered by CTGs between January 1978 and January 1979 and 
adoption and submittal by each subsequent January of additional RACT 
requirements for sources covered by CTGs issued by the previous 
January.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
3745-31-01(III)(4) of Ohio's Administrative Code) and a significant net 
emissions increase (as defined in paragraphs 3745-31-01, paragraphs 
(SSS) and (LLLLL)(1) of Ohio's Administrative Code) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in paragraph 3745-31-
01(LLLLL)(2) of Ohio's Administrative Code.

Subpart LL--Oklahoma

0
17. Section 52.1929 is amended by adding paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.1929  Significant deterioration of air quality.

* * * * *
    (c)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in Oklahoma's approved plan apply to stationary 
sources of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves 
that application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to 
regulation'', as provided in this paragraph (b), and the

[[Page 82560]]

Administrator takes no action on that application to the extent that 
GHGs are not ``subject to regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using EPA-approved 
procedures in Oklahoma Air Pollution Control Regulation 1.4.4(b)) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in the EPA-approved 
Oklahoma Air Pollution Control Regulation 1.4.4(b)(3) and (22), 
definitions for ``net emissions increase'' and ``significant) occur. 
For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in 1.4.4(b)(22) of the 
EPA-approved definition for ``significant'' of Oklahoma's Air Pollution 
Control Regulations.

Subpart OO--Rhode Island

0
18. Section 52.2072 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.2072  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Rhode Island's plan, as identified in Sec.  
52.2070 of this subpart, for the attainment and maintenance of the 
national standards under section 110 of the Clean Air Act. Furthermore, 
the Administrator finds the plan satisfies all requirements of Part D, 
Title I, of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1977, except as noted 
below. In addition, continued satisfaction of the requirements of Part 
D for the ozone portion of the SIP depends on the adoption and 
submittal of RACT requirements by January 1, 1981 for the sources 
covered by CTGs issued between January 1978 and January 1979 and 
adoption and submittal by each subsequent January as additional RACT 
requirements for sources covered by CTGs issued by the previous 
January.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
9.1.1 of Rhode Island's Air Pollution Control Regulation No. 9) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in 9.1.24 and 9.1.34 of 
Rhode Island's Air Pollution Control Regulation No. 9) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value for ``any other 
pollutant'' in 9.1.34 of Rhode Island's Air Pollution Control 
Regulation No. 9.

Subpart PP--South Carolina

0
19. Section 52.2122 is amended by adding paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.2122  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (c)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (c), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''

[[Page 82561]]

    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (c)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (c)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
South Carolina Air Pollution Control Regulations and Standards (South 
Carolina Regulations) 61-62.5, Standard No. 7, paragraph (a)(2)(iv)) 
and a significant net emissions increase (as defined in South Carolina 
Air Pollution Control Regulations and Standards (South Carolina 
Regulations) 61-62.5, Standard No. 7, paragraphs (b)(34) and 
(b)(49)(i)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall 
be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the 
pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is 
defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in 
South Carolina Air Pollution Control Regulations and Standards (South 
Carolina Regulations) 61-62.5, Standard No. 7, paragraph (b)(49)(ii).

Subpart QQ--South Dakota

0
20. Section 52.2172 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.2172  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves South Dakota's plan as meeting the requirements 
of section 110 of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1977. Furthermore, 
the Administrator finds that the plan satisfies all requirements of 
Part D of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1977.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in paragraphs 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i)) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in 40 CFR 
52.21(b)(23)(ii).

Subpart RR--Tennessee

0
21. Section 52.2222 is amended by adding paragraph (d) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.2222  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (d)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (d), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (d)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:

[[Page 82562]]

    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (d)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (d)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
Tennessee Air Pollution Control Regulation 1200-03-09-.01(4)(c)(4) and 
a significant net emissions increase (as defined in Tennessee Air 
Pollution Control Regulation 1200-03-09-.01, paragraphs (4)(b)(4) and 
(4)(b)(24)(i)) occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase 
shall be based on tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming 
the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is 
defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in 
Tennessee Air Pollution Control Regulation 1200-03-09-.01, paragraph 
(4)(b)(24)(ii).

Subpart TT--Utah

0
22. Section 52.2323 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.2323  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Utah's plan as meeting the requirements of 
section 110 of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1977. Furthermore, the 
Administrator finds that the plan satisfies all requirements of Part D, 
Title 1, of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1977, except as noted 
below.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) the term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
40 CFR 52.21(a)(2)(iv)) and a significant net emissions increase (as 
defined in paragraphs 40 CFR 52.21(b)(3) and (b)(23)(i)) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value in 40 CFR 
52.21(b)(23)(ii).

Subpart UU--Vermont

0
23. Section 52.2372 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.2372  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Vermont's plan as identified in Sec.  52.2370 
for the attainment and maintenance of the national standards under 
section 110 of the Clean Air Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds 
the plans satisfy all requirements of Part D, Title I, of the Clean Air 
Act, as amended in 1977, except as noted below. In addition, continued 
satisfaction of the requirements of Part D for the ozone portion of the 
SIP depends on the adoption and submittal of RACT requirements by July 
1, 1980 for the sources covered by CTGs issued between January, 1978 
and January, 1979 and adoption and submittal by each subsequent January 
of additional RACT requirements for sources covered by CTGs issued by 
the previous January.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or

[[Page 82563]]

    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
the definitions for ``actual emissions'' and ``allowable emissions'' 
under section 5-101 of Chapter 5, subchapter I of Vermont's Air 
Pollution Control Environmental Protection regulations) and a 
significant net emissions increase (as defined in the definitions for 
``significant'' under section 5-101 of Chapter 5, subchapter I of 
Vermont's Air Pollution Control Environmental Protection regulations) 
occur. For the pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on 
tpy CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant 
GHGs is a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 
75,000 tpy CO2e instead of applying the value in the 
definition of ``major modification'' under section 5-101 of Chapter 5, 
subchapter I of Vermont's Air Pollution Control Environmental 
Protection regulations.

Subpart VV--Virginia

0
24. Section 52.2423 is amended by adding paragraph (t) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  52.2423  Approval status.

* * * * *
    (t)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (t), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (t)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (t)--
    (i) the term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (t)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 9 
VAC 5-80-1605 G of the Commonwealth of Virginia's Administrative Code) 
and a significant net emissions increase (as defined in the definitions 
for ``net emissions increase,'' ``significant'' subparagraph a., and 
``significant emissions increase'' under 9 VAC 5-80-1605 C of the 
Commonwealth of Virginia's Administrative Code) occur. For the 
pollutant GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy 
CO2e, and shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is 
a regulated NSR pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy 
CO2e instead of applying the value specified in the 
definition for ``significant'' subparagraph b. under 9 VAC 5-80-1605 C 
of the Commonwealth of Virginia's Administrative Code.

Subpart YY--Wisconsin

0
25. Section 52.2572 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  52.2572  Approval status.

    (a) With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the 
Administrator approves Wisconsin's plans for the attainment and 
maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards under section 
110 of the Clean Air Act. Furthermore, the Administrator finds the 
plans satisfy all requirements of Part D, Title I, of the Clean Air Act 
as amended in 1977, except as noted below. In addition, continued 
satisfaction of the requirements of Part D for the Ozone portion of the 
State Implementation Plan depends on the adoption and submittal of RACT 
requirements on:
    (1) Group III Control Techniques Guideline sources within 1 year 
after January 1st following the issuance of each Group III control 
technique guideline; and
    (2) Major (actual emissions equal or greater than 100 tons VOC per 
year) non-control technique guideline sources in accordance with the 
State's schedule contained in the 1982 Ozone SIP revision for 
Southeastern Wisconsin.
    (b)(1) Insofar as the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) 
provisions found in this subpart apply to stationary sources of 
greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions, the Administrator approves that 
application only to the extent that GHGs are ``subject to regulation'', 
as provided in this paragraph (b), and the Administrator takes no 
action on that application to the extent that GHGs are not ``subject to 
regulation.''
    (2) Beginning January 2, 2011, the pollutant GHGs is subject to 
regulation if:
    (i) The stationary source is a new major stationary source for a 
regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will emit or will 
have the potential to emit 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; or
    (ii) The stationary source is an existing major stationary source 
for a

[[Page 82564]]

regulated NSR pollutant that is not GHGs, and also will have an 
emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and an emissions 
increase of 75,000 tpy CO2e or more; and,
    (3) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition to the provisions in 
paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the pollutant GHGs shall also be 
subject to regulation:
    (i) At a new stationary source that will emit or have the potential 
to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e; or
    (ii) At an existing stationary source that emits or has the 
potential to emit 100,000 tpy CO2e, when such stationary 
source undertakes a physical change or change in the method of 
operation that will result in an emissions increase of 75,000 tpy 
CO2e or more.
    (4) For purposes of this paragraph (b)--
    (i) The term greenhouse gas shall mean the air pollutant defined in 
40 CFR 86.1818-12(a) as the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: 
Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, 
perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
    (ii) The term tpy CO2 equivalent emissions 
(CO2e) shall represent an amount of GHGs emitted, and shall 
be computed as follows:
    (A) Multiplying the mass amount of emissions (tpy), for each of the 
six greenhouse gases in the pollutant GHGs, by the gas's associated 
global warming potential published at Table A-1 to subpart A of 40 CFR 
part 98--Global Warming Potentials.
    (B) Sum the resultant value from paragraph (b)(4)(ii)(A) of this 
section for each gas to compute a tpy CO2e.
    (iii) The term emissions increase shall mean that both a 
significant emissions increase (as calculated using the procedures in 
NR 405.025 of Wisconsin's Administrative Code) and a significant net 
emissions increase (as defined in NR 405.02, paragraphs (24), (27)(a), 
and (27m) of Wisconsin's Administrative Code) occur. For the pollutant 
GHGs, an emissions increase shall be based on tpy CO2e, and 
shall be calculated assuming the pollutant GHGs is a regulated NSR 
pollutant, and ``significant'' is defined as 75,000 tpy CO2e 
instead of applying the value in NR 405.02(27)(c) of Wisconsin's 
Administrative Code.

[FR Doc. 2010-32766 Filed 12-29-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P